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Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

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Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Vie Feb 01, 2008 5:26 pm

Recuerdo del primer mensaje :

Miami Herald
July 3, 1982
Agents seize satellite equipment bought by Cuban U.N. diplomat



By GUILLERMO MARTINEZ

Federal agents in Orlando have seized $38,000 worth of satellite monitoring equipment purchased by a top-ranking Cuban diplomat in violation of the U.S. Trading with the Enemy Act, a Customs Department spokesman announced Friday.
A Cuban diplomat at the United Nations purchased the equipment from a Florida company by mail, according to Ed Kittredge, a U.S. Customs Department spokesman in Washington.
The equipment was seized Thursday by FBI agents and the U.S. Customs Service in a United Parcel Service warehouse in Orlando.
Federal agencies are checking into the possibility that the equipment might be used for spying, said a State Department official who would talk only if his name was not used.
"It is still premature to say" if the violation of the 20-year embargo on trading with Cuba is serious enough to warrant the expulsion of the diplomat, the official added.
"After the investigation we will see what we do," he said.
The equipment, which is available commercially, can be converted to a sophisticated telecommunications monitor, according to officials at Customs. They added it did not include a receiving "dish," commonly used to pick up television signals from satellites.
Kittredge said the name of the company selling the equipment is not being divulged "because they are cooperating with us."
The incident is the first involving a Cuban diplomat since February of last year, when the Reagan Administration expelled Ricardo Escartin, first secretary in the Cuban Interests Section in Washington.
Escartin was accused of engaging in "intelligence gathering activities" and conspiring with American businessmen to violate the embargo on trade with Cuba.
Customs officials said that the Cuban diplomat involved in the latest incident could not be arrested because he is covered by diplomatic immunity.
Officials at the State Department refused to identify the diplomat Friday. Kittredge said they could not identify him because "the State Department told us not to."
An official of Cuba's Interests Section in Washington said the Cuban government had not been officially notified of the incident and thus he could not comment.
A woman who answered the phone at the Cuban mission to the United Nations in New York also declined comment saying, "Here we are not accustomed to make any statements to the press."

Miami Herald

February 27, 1982, page 1
Spies in Miami?
Castro sent 300 of them, defector testifies
By JIM McGEE
WASHINGTON - An estimated 300 Cuban intelligence agents entered South Florida during and since the Mariel boatlift, a congressional subcommittee was told Friday.
If that is true, said a former Cuban spy testifying before the subcommittee, the agents are probably here to "distract" the FBI.
"One of the objectives is to distract the counterintelligence services of the United States," said former Cuban spy Gerardo Peraza, 42, -who quit the Cuban intelligence service in 1971 and defected to the United States.
There "is no possibility of detecting the true agents. The FBI doesn't have time to detect the real agents," Peraza said through an interpreter.
The comment came after subcommittee chairman Sen. Jeremiah Denton (R., Ala.), a conservative Republican, said congressional investigators have been told "there are now 300 [Cuban intelligence[ officers and agents in the Miami area alone" who have arrived during and since Mariel.
Subcommittee investigators said their information about Florida came from the FBI and local law enforcement agencies. FBI officials declined to comment for The Herald on Peraza's testimony.
Peraza said Cuba's intelligence agency, the General Directorate for Intelligence (DGI), relied on the Soviet Union for training and equipment.
"The Soviet Union utilizes Cuba because of its great possibilities in the intelligence field against the U.S.," Peraza said, " . . . and the great possibilities of penetrating the U.S."
Later in the hearings, which focused on Peraza's experiences, Denton's staff produced a photograph of Russian-made hand grenades that he said have been linked to three Miami-area bombings. The Russian grenades were apparently stolen from a shipment of arms from Cuba to El Salvador, a Florida investigator said.
Staff investigators showed the photograph of the smooth, hand-held cylinders and said they interviewed a jailed informant who claimed the grenades were intended "to blow things up" in Miami.
"We went down there [to Miami] to talk to a guy in prison," said a member of the subcommittee staff who asked not to be named. "This guy was given the hand grenades . . . they were sent over [from Cuba] to be used by him.
"This guy was specifically told to blow things up. He was told by a guy who thought he was, or believed to be, a [Cuban agent] to do this."
State and federal law enforcement officials confirmed Friday afternoon that Russian-made devices have been used in Miami bombings.
The most recent incident occurred last Monday when an explosion rocked the neighborhood at NW 27th Ave and 16th Terrace.
"We know where they came from," said Sergio Pinon, and investigator with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. "We know how they got to the U.S. from Cuba."
Peraza, speaking in Spanish, said he left Cuba 12 years ago in protest of a requirement that intelligence officers join the Communist Party and because the Cuban agency had been placed under the control of Soviet intelligence.
He said the USSR, in taking command of the agency, was interested primarily in "the penetration of United States intelligence."
In introducing the swarthy, heavy-set former spy, Denton said he was placed in charge of the signals bureau in the DGI in 1967 to monitor counterrevolutionary activities among Cuban exiles. Denton said he was later assigned to the Cuban embassy in London with the cover title of second secretary.
Throughout his testimony, Peraza stressed that the United States was uppermost in the minds of Cuban and Soviet intelligence leaders.
Even when the DGI would try to recruit British officials, he said, the goal was to hurt America.
"It was to utilize these people in one way or another to penetrate the U.S.," Peraza said. " . . . All the other countries where they work, it is [directed] at the U.S."
Peraza said he made the decision to defect after watching Cuban intelligence become more and more a KGB operation.
He told of attending Russian training centers for spies - where he studied beside recruits from other Third World nations.
"We [the Cuban trainees] were the apple of their eyes," he said of his Soviet trainers. "The preferred ones. We had more access to information."
Peraza also said Cuba began establishing training centers - which were essentially schools for terrorism.
"Thousands of terrorists have gone through that school for special training," he said.
Shifting his focus to New York and Washington, Peraza said most of the Cuban diplomats are trained intelligence agents. He said the general orders are to gather political, economic and military information about the U.S.
He said a leftist student group in Florida, the Venceremos Brigade, performed a similar function.
"Venceremos" is Spanish for "We shall win." The pro-Castro youth brigade was made up of American college students who made annual "solidarity" visits to Cuba to cut sugar cane and work the construction industry in the 1970s.
"The Venceremos Brigade helped by sending the telephone books [of Florida communities] and [other] information, including [data] on the U.S. Senate," Peraza said.
For one period, he said, there was "and extraordinary emphasis placed on several senators of the U.S. … with some success."
He did not name the senators.
Near the end of the morning session, Sen. John East (R., N.C.) asked a final question.
"You see the Soviet-DGI connection as alive and well in the United States?"
"Yes," the ex-spy said.


The Miami Herald
April 25, 1983, page 1-D
Castro agents on Miami force, says Carollo
When Sen. Paula Hawkins and a Senate subcommittee get to Miami Saturday for a hearing on Cuba's involvement in drug smuggling, they're going to get an earful.
For one thing, Miami City Commissioner Joe Carollo is willing to tell them there are Castro agents on the Miami police force.
"I'm extremely sure there are Miami police officers working for Communist Cuba," he says. Carollo says he bases the charge on information from the turncoat agents of the Direccion General de Inteligencia (DGI), Castro's version of Russia's KGB. The agents' purpose is to harass anti-Castro activists and inhibit efforts of the President's anti-drug task force, Carollo says.
Miami Police Chief Kenneth Harms declined to comment on Carollo's charge. Carollo and Harms, it should be noted, have been feuding for years.
Saturday's hearing, at 9 a.m. at the Dade County Courthouse, was called by the U.S. Senate subcommittee on national security and terrorism, which is seeking to involve Hawkins' Senate Drug Enforcement Caucus more actively in probing the Castro-cocaine connection.


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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Sáb Mar 15, 2008 4:12 pm

The Associated Press
November 8, 2002
Cuba Denies Charges About Diplomats
By ANITA SNOW
Associated Press Writer
HAVANA (AP) — Cuba rejected U.S. charges that four Cuban diplomats who were ordered to leave the United States engaged in
unacceptable activities, and said American diplomats in Havana were involved in "subversive'' work.
The Foreign Ministry statement set the stage for the possible retaliatory expulsion of American diplomats from Havana. ``Cuba has
the right to respond, and will, at the appropriate moment,'' it said.
The United States government ``doesn't have the least bit of moral authority, nor any justification to propose these assertions
against our diplomats,'' the statement said.
It warned that ``we can present broad evidence of the activities of constant espionage and subversion against Cuba.''
On Tuesday, the U.S. State Department ordered the expulsion of two Washington-based Cuban diplomats for their role in support of
a spy for Cuba who recently was sentenced to a 25-year prison term.
Oscar Redondo Toledo and Gustavo Machin Gomez were given 10 days to leave the country.
The order came shortly before two members of Cuba's mission to the United Nations were asked to leave the United States for
``engaging in activities deemed to be harmful to the United States'' — believed to be spying.
They were later identified as Francisco Gonzalez Garcia, a counselor, and Carlos Augusto Suanes Flexas, a second secretary.
Havana blamed the action against its diplomats on Cuban-born U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Otto Reich. It said Reich was
obsessed with trying to halt ``the unstoppable advance of forces in the United States against the policy of aggressions and attacks
against Cuba.''

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Sáb Mar 15, 2008 4:20 pm

The Miami Herald
Apr. 11, 2002
Cuban spy in U.S. for debriefings
BY JUAN O. TAMAYO
A top Cuban spy who defected in Panama two weeks ago has been brought to the United States for debriefings on Havana intelligence operations in
Canada, America and Panama, U.S. and Panamanian officials say.
Orlando Brito Pestana, whose identity was previously undisclosed, was stationed in the early 1990s in Canada, a critical Cuban intelligence post because
of its access to the unguarded U.S. border.
The FBI later blocked his way when Havana tried to appoint him to the Cuban Interests Section in Washington, U.S. officials added.
Brito was accredited as Cuba's commercial attaché in Panama when he asked Panamanian security officials on March 27 to help him, his wife and two
daughters defect to America, a senior Panamanian security advisor said.
He was flown to the United States two days later aboard a commercial airliner, using false travel documents arranged by U.S. and Panamanian officials,
the security advisor said on condition of anonymity.
Brito is believed to be one of the most senior Cuban intelligence officials to defect in recent years. It is a blow to Havana intelligence operations already
battered by the capture of confessed spy Ana Belén Móntez at the Pentagon last year and several members of the ''Wasp Network'' in Miami in 1998.
Two U.S. government officials with access to intelligence data said Brito is undergoing debriefings by U.S. intelligence officials that could last for months,
depending on the value of his knowledge.
But an FBI official who has handled Cuban spy cases warned that Brito may also be a double-agent sent by Havana to misinform.
''Cuba has one of the most aggressive intelligence operations in the world, and until we know more he will probably be treated as a potential double
agent,'' the official said.
A State Department spokesman said he could not confirm Brito's presence in the United States. The usual CIA procedure is to keep foreign defectors
under wraps while they are debriefed in isolation.
Foreign Minister José Alemán has said the Cuban Embassy reported Brito's disappearance in mid-March and asked Panamanian authorities to cancel his
diplomatic identification card and drivers' license.
LINKED TO SCANDAL
The Panamanian security advisor said Brito may have decided to defect because of a scandal in Panama involving Sunset Group International, a
Panamanian firm that has run an auto dealership in Havana and financed part of Cuba's sugar harvest since the mid-1990s.
The firm is wracked by a bitter dispute within the family of its owners, allegations that it bribed Panamanian Congressmen and reports that Cuba is
investigating it for corrupting Cuban officials in Havana.
Sunset President Martín Rodin told reporters in Panama on Tuesday that the Cuban government owed him about $30 million for car purchases and sugar
harvest loans.
''As the commercial attaché here, this guy would have been up to his eyeballs in this stuff and maybe thought it was time to pick up and run,'' said the
Panamanian official, who asked that his name not be published.
Panamanian Foreign Ministry spokesman Mauricio Benaim said Brito had not asked for political asylum in Panama. ''It is curious that he simply
disappeared,'' he said in a telephone interview from Panama City.
Brito, believed to be in his early 50s, first came into the limelight when he served as vice consul in Montreal. On Feb. 13 1994, Canada expelled him and
another Cuban diplomat for spying.
The Toronto Sun newspaper at the time identified Brito as head of Cuba's intelligence office in Canada, a key post because of Canada's strong commercial
ties with Havana and Cuba's use of Canadian territory as a base from which to handle intelligence agents inside the United States.
U.S. officials said they could not confirm whether Brito was the office chief or a lower ranking agent.
INTELLIGENCE CENTERS
''Canada and Mexico are always important Cuban intelligence centers because of their access to the U.S. border -- in the case of Canada so easy to
infiltrate,'' said Carlos Cajaraville, a former Cuban intelligence agent who defected in 1995.
About two years after his expulsion from Canada, Cuba's Foreign Ministry notified the State Department that it planned to appoint Brito to the Cuban
Interests Section in Washington, U.S. congressional officials said.
But FBI counter-intelligence officials persuaded the State Department to deny Brito a visa, arguing that it would look foolish to accept a Cuban diplomat
already branded a spy and expelled by Canada, the aides said.
Brito was named commercial attaché at the Cuban Embassy in Panama City last year, in charge of monitoring trade links between Cuba and Panama,
especially with companies in the Colon Free Zone, an area at the Atlantic gateway to the Panama Canal.
Cuba has long used Havana-owned and Panamanian firms in the duty-free zone to get around the 40-year-old U.S. trade embargo and purchase
U.S.-made products, from computers to industrial air conditioners for hotels.
The Cuban Embassy in Panama has declined comment on the Brito case. But a person who answered the telephone at the mission Wednesday said,
``we don't talk about traitors.''

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Sáb Mar 15, 2008 4:26 pm

The Miami Herald
Mar. 14, 2003
Former Cuban intelligence officer arrested in Dade
BY ALFONSO CHARDY AND MICHAEL VASQUEZ
Homeland Security agents on Thursday arrested a motel clerk on charges he failed to formally advise federal authorities that he had been an intelligence officer in Cuba before coming to the United States.
Lázaro Amaya La Puente, a night-shift clerk at the Le Jeune Motel on Southwest Eighth Street, was picked up by agents of the Department of Homeland Security's bureau of immigration and customs enforcement, one of three bureaus that replaced the Immigration and Naturalization Service on March 1.
On Thursday night, his family and employer angrily reacted to the arrest.
''This is the type of thing that happens in Cuba, not the United States,'' said Raul Soberon, the motel manager. ``Lázaro is hard-working, innocent, and wanted nothing more than to stay in the United States and bring his wife and two children here.
''This is an awful injustice,'' he said.
Amaya La Puente, 39, is the latest in a growing list of suspects with alleged Cuban intelligence connections arrested or convicted in South Florida and elsewhere in the country in recent years.
The most prominent recent case involved Ana Belén Motes, a senior U.S. military intelligence officer in Washington, sentenced to 25 years in federal prison on espionage charges in October. In 2001, a federal jury in Miami convicted five Cubans on 23 spying-related charges stemming from a federal investigation of a South Florida Cuban spy ring known as La Red Avispa -- the Wasp Network.
Homeland security officials in Miami would not say if Amaya La Puente had done any spying in the United States. Dan Vara, a Homeland Security district counsel in Miami, said the charge against Amaya La Puente was failure to disclose his past connections to Cuban intelligence.
FAILED TO REGISTER
Vara said Amaya La Puente failed to register with the U.S. attorney's office as a foreign agent within 30 days of arriving in the country -- as the law requires. Amaya La Puente arrived in 2000.
Ana Santiago, a homeland security spokeswoman, said in the written statement that Amaya La Puente was a ''former agent of the Cuban Ministry of Interior,'' a Cuban cabinet office that oversees state security and intelligence operations for the government of Fidel Castro.
Amaya La Puente allegedly conducted operations against the U.S. diplomatic mission in Havana and human rights advocates on the island, the statement said. It added that federal agents had been investigating Amaya La Puente for the last six months.
''As a former operative of the Cuban state security service, Amaya had been involved in conducting intelligence gathering operations against human rights activists and U.S. interests section personnel in Cuba before coming to the United States,'' the statement said. ``U.S. authorities learned of this information about Amaya, well after he entered the U.S. in 2000.''
The statement did not say how U.S. immigration officials learned of Amaya La Puente's intelligence past.
`THAT'S WHY HE LEFT'
Soberon, his boss, said the government must have learned about his past from an asylum application. He said he helped Amaya La Puente translate to English the asylum application where he explained his past work for the Cuban government and why he could never return to the island.
Soberon said Amaya La Puente told him that one of his jobs was to monitor who entered the U.S. Interests Section in Havana. Soberon said Amaya La Puente said he fled Cuba because the government kept pressuring him to come up with more information and he would not. ''That's why he left Cuba,'' Soberon said.
Adriana Hermida, Amaya La Puente's cousin in Hialeah, said he has a wife and two children -- a 12-year-old boy and an 8-year-old girl -- in Cuba. She said Amaya La Puente did tell the U.S. government of his intelligence past when he applied for asylum.
''I think he was too honest,'' Hermida said, adding that her cousin felt pressured by Cuban authorities to conduct intelligence operations.
Amaya La Puente is now in custody at the Krome detention center in west Miami-Dade. He will remain there pending further proceedings in immigration court. Vara said Amaya La Puente will face deportation proceedings. No criminal charge has been filed.
''We will continue to identify and apprehend others like Amaya,'' said James Goldman, Florida district director for the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. "The safety and well-being of our community and our nation is not negotiable.''
Soberon said Amaya La Puente was no threat to national security: He worked double-shifts at the busy motel, greeted couples, collected their cash, assigned them rooms, and cleaned up afterward. ''What little money he made he would try to send back to his wife and his children,'' Soberon said. "He lives for his family.''

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por jose gonzalez el Dom Mar 16, 2008 6:13 pm

keep on going cuba4free.....i can't stop reading....

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Dom Abr 27, 2008 8:51 am

Witness: I was a Castro spy in foundation
By JUAN O. TAMAYO
Herald Staff Writer
HAVANA -- A self-proclaimed spy for Cuba who claimed to have won the trust
of leading members of the Cuban American National Foundation testified
Thursday that foundation President Jose Francisco ``Pepe'' Hernandez offered him
$20,000 to set off two bombs in Havana.
The witness, who identified himself as Percy Francisco Alvarado and appeared to
be in his 50s, said he was a Guatemala native who has lived in Cuba since 1960.
As a State Security agent code-named Monk, Alvarado testified, he traveled often
to Miami and met with Cuban exiles and foundation officials. He did not claim to
have been part of the foundation staff in the United States, but said he received
money to act as an undercover agent in Cuba.
In Washington, foundation spokeswoman Ninoska Perez said she had never heard
of Alvarado and denied that he ever had any connection with foundation.
``If he had infiltrated [the foundation], you think he would go unnoticed?'' Perez
asked. ``No one's heard of him.''
``This whole thing is a circus,'' she said. ``Last week they had a trial where they
wouldn't let in journalists. Now they have some guy claiming this. Where's the
evidence?
``We have repeatedly said this is not the type of activity we would get involved
with.''
Alvarado's allegations, made at the trial of a confessed Salvadoran bomber, was
part of the testimony by Cuban security officers alleging the existence within the
Cuban American National Foundation (CANF) of a secret group of officials who
had financed violent attacks on Cuba.
Many attempts alleged
According to the testimony and evidence offered by the prosecution, the group's
campaign from 1992 to 1998 included 15 bombings carried out or attempted in
Cuba, plus several attempts to kill President Fidel Castro, the last two in the
Dominican Republic and Venezuela.
Parts of the campaign were carried out through Luis Posada Carriles, a Cuban
exile and clandestine figure living in El Salvador, apparently to avoid violating U.S.
neutrality laws, Interior Ministry Col. Adalberto Rabeiro testified.
``But CANF played the protagonist and hegemonic role in financing and organizing
these acts of terror,'' Rabeiro said in closing testimony at the trial of Raul Ernesto
Cruz Leon, 27, a Salvadoran who has confessed to six bombings around Havana
in 1997.
Death penalty sought
Prosecutor Rafael Pino wound up the four-day trial by portraying Cruz Leon as a
wanton terrorist whose bombs killed one Italian businessman and exploded near
children. Pino requested that Cruz Leon be sentenced to death by firing squad.
Defense attorney Daniel Rippes argued that Cruz Leon is a foolish young
adventurer who had no political motives but was in debt and needed the money
offered to him by a Salvadoran friend, Francisco Chavez, to place the bombs. The
five-judge panel has 12 days to issue a verdict.
The unusually detailed testimony presented at the trial appeared to form part of a
government effort to portray itself as being under constant attacks from Miami
exiles that justify harsh controls on domestic dissent.
``If U.S. officials can't stop these diabolical things, we have to take whatever
measures are necessary to defend our revolution,'' said Rabeiro, chief investigator
for the State Security Department of the Interior Ministry.
Much of the information against foundation members was turned over to ``a team
of specialists sent by important U.S. officials'' to Havana last August, Rabeiro said,
``but we're still waiting for results.''
Rabeiro said he could not reveal all the evidence his department had gathered at
the trial ``because the battle to protect our nation continues.'' The prosecutor and
Alvarado, the star witness produced Thursday, offered evidence for some of the
allegations but not others.
The evidence included tape recordings of telephone chats and a cellular telephone,
allegedly bought by Pepe Hernandez and given first to the spy and later to two
would-be bombers.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Dom Abr 27, 2008 8:53 am

Secret anti-Castro group
Rabeiro charged that several foundation officials had established a secret
``paramilitary group'' within the anti-Castro lobby in 1992 to carry out violent
attacks on Cuban government targets.
He alleged that its members included Hernandez; Luis Zuñiga, head of the
foundation's human rights branch; Arnaldo Monzon and Horacio Salvador Otero,
members of the 28-member board of directors; employee Roberto Martin Perez;
and Guillermo Novo Sampol, a Cuban exile known to work closely with the
foundation.
Rabeiro charged that the foundation's late chairman, Jorge Mas Canosa, ``knew
the details'' of two of the group's conspiracies, but left him conspicuously out of the
list of alleged members of the secret unit.
Alvarado, the professed spy, testified that he first met Zuñiga in late 1993 during
one of his visits to Miami -- he did not explain the reason for his trips -- and was
recruited as a foundation agent code-named 44.
Zuñiga told him that several foundation officials had established ``a parallel secret
military organization named the Cuban National Front'' that was dedicated to
organizing violent attacks against Cuba, Alvarado testified.
Zuñiga also told him that half of the foundation's 28 directors were involved in or
knew about the group, Alvarado said, and paid him to gather information on
strategic Cuban targets like electricity and water installations.
Alvarado said Zuñiga later put him under the supervision of Alfredo Otero, a
Miami businessman. Otero, 63, is one of seven exiles awaiting trial in Puerto Rico
on charges of plotting to kill Castro when he visited the Venezuelan island of
Margarita in 1997.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Dom Abr 27, 2008 8:54 am

Money, position-finder
Otero gave him ``thousands'' in counterfeit Cuban currency to undermine the
economy in mid-1994, Alvarado testified, plus a hand-held satellite position finder
known as a GPS, to mark the exact sites of important government installations in
Cuba.
Alvarado said Otero also gave him a cellular phone to report the GPS data back
to Miami, but that the Miami man asked that he return it when he visited Miami
again in late 1994.
Rabeiro said the same cell phone was seized in early 1995 when Cuban police
arrested two exiles, Santos Armando Martinez Rueda and Jose Enrique Ramirez,
who had flown into Cuba using false Costa Rican passports to set off several
bombs.
Cuban security investigators traced the cell phone back to foundation President
Pepe Hernandez, the State Security official testified, showing copies of what he
said were the phone's registration document.
Martinez Rueda and Ramirez used the phone to transmit information to Guillermo
Novo Sampol, Rabeiro added, showing what he said were Cuban records of calls
made from the phone to a U.S. number registered to Novo Sampol.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Dom Abr 27, 2008 8:55 am

Leader's relationship
Alvarado testified that Pepe Hernandez joined Otero ``in handling me'' around July
of 1994 after asking him to take a lie detector test. ``Having been prepared for it, I
agreed and passed,'' he said.
In September of 1994 the plots turned more serious as Hernandez and Otero
offered him $20,000 to take two bombs back to Havana and detonate them in
public places to sow panic among foreign tourists, Alvarado said.
That November he flew to Guatemala City and received the bombs and instruction
on how to arm them from Posada and Gaspar Jimenez, Alvarado said. Jimenez is
known as a Posada friend who has acted as chauffeur and guard for Dr. Alberto
Hernandez, who succeeded Mas Canosa as foundation chairman.
Alvarado testified that he turned over the bombs to authorities in Havana and told
his Miami bosses that he was too scared to detonate them. But at a later meeting
in Miami Pepe Hernandez and Arnaldo Monzon ``offered me still another $20,000
on top of that to set them off,'' he added.
Cuban officials have previously identified Monzon, a rich clothing retailer who
owns homes in New Jersey and North Miami Beach, as the main financier behind
a dozen bombings by Cruz Leon, his friend Francisco Chavez, another Salvadoran
and two Guatemalans arrested in Cuba last spring.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Dom Abr 27, 2008 8:56 am

Captured weapons
Prosecutors laid out a wide array of terror implements for the final day of Cruz
Leon's trial, filling two tables with evidence allegedly seized from Martinez Rueda
and from the two jailed Salvadorans and two Guatemalans.
There were dozens of timers and detonators, a five-gallon paint can filled with C-4
explosive, and a crossbow and ``stun gun'' carried by two elderly Miami exiles
captured when they arrived in Cuba last year.
``Today the material author of terror bombings is on trial here. But from that bench
are missing the intellectual authors -- CANF, Pepe Hernandez, Arnaldo Monzon,
Luis Zuñiga, Alfredo Otero, Posada Carriles and Gaspar Jimenez,'' Alvarado told
the courtroom in closing his testimony.
Rabeiro wound up his presentation and all the testimony with a video presentation
on Posada, 68, a CIA-trained explosives expert who was identified by The Herald
in late 1997 as the mastermind behind the Cruz Leon bombings. Posada later
confirmed his role in the blasts, but ultimately denied that the foundation was
involved in the plot.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Dom Abr 27, 2008 9:01 am

Cuban Espionage Activities Against the U.S.
Thursday, 31 July 2003, 12:40 pm
Press Release: US State Department
Cuban Espionage Activities Against the United States
State Dept. highlights several recent incidents
The U.S. Department of State issued a fact sheet on July 30, eexamining Cuba's history of espionage against the United States and
outlining several examples of recent anti-U.S. spying by Cuban agents.
These incidents are simply the latest evidence that the regime of Cuban
dictator Fidel Castro "has long targeted the United States for intensive espionage activities," the State Department said.
Following is the text of the fact sheet, with further details:
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Washington, D.C.
FACT SHEET
Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs
July 30, 2003
Cuba: Espionage
The Castro regime has long targeted the United States for intensive espionage activities. Castro himself told CNN in an interview in 1998:
"Yes, we have sometimes dispatched Cuban citizens to the United States to infiltrate counter-revolutionary organizations, to inform us
about activities that are of great interest to us. I think we have a right to do this."

-- Ana Montes, a Defense Intelligence Agency analyst, confessed to spying for Cuba for 16 years (from 1985 to the time of her arrest on
September 21, 2001). Among other highly damaging actions, she gave the Cuban Government the names of four U.S. covert intelligence
officers working in Cuba and gathered writings, documents, and materials for unlawful delivery to the Government of Cuba.
-- Seven Cuban spies, the so-called Wasp Network, were convicted of or confessed to espionage or related crimes in June and September
2001. The group sought to infiltrate U.S. Southern Command headquarters. One was convicted for delivering a message to the
Cuban Government that contributed to the death of four fliers from Brothers to the Rescue who were shot down in 1996 by Cuban MiGs
in international airspace.

-- An INS official, provided information in 2000 in a sting operation, thereafter passed the information to a business associate with ties to
Cuban intelligence. As a corollary to this case, two Cuban diplomats were expelled from the United States for espionage activities.

-- Over a 15-year period from 1983 to 1998, 15 members of the Cuban mission to the United Nations were expelled for espionage
activities, including three who were handlers for the Wasp Network in 1998.

-- Cuban spies have also found considerable success penetrating U.S.-based exile groups. A notable example is that of Juan Pablo
Roque, a former MiG-23 pilot who defected to the United States in 1992, became a paid source for the FBI, and joined the ranks of the
Brothers to the Rescue (BTTR). He re-defected back to Cuba just days after the early 1996 BTTR shoot down, denouncing the exile
group on Cuban television and accusing it of planning terrorist attacks against Cuba and Castro.
-- A similar example involves the case of Jose Rafael Fernandez Brenes, who jumped ship from a Cuban merchant vessel in 1988.
From 1988-1991, he helped establish and run the U.S. Government-financed TV Marti, whose signal was jammed from its
inception in March 1990, due in part to frequency and technical data provided by Fernandez Brenes.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Dom Abr 27, 2008 9:08 am

A Document by Cuban Spy Talks of Acts Against C.I.A.


By JULIA PRESTON and TIM WEINER


EXICO CITY, Oct. 7 — When he was arrested by the Mexican government this week, a Cuban spy on the run from his government was carrying a document, parts of which were made public today, in which he outlined his career running operations against the Central Intelligence Agency.
The Cuban official, Pedro Riera Escalante, who was summarily deported by Mexico to Havana on Wednesday, served under cover as the Cuban consul here from 1986 through 1991. In the document, he described Cuban espionage operations against the C.I.A. station in Mexico City and other operations he ran in Europe and Africa.
His deportation ended his month-long effort to win political asylum in Mexico.
Mr. Riera, who had become deeply disillusioned with his president, Fidel Castro, also spoke about his intelligence work in general terms in conversations with The New York Times, with Mexican foreign relations and national security officials with whom he discussed asylum and with human rights advocates who helped him petition for refuge.
In the document, excerpts of which were published by the Mexico City newspaper Reforma on Friday, Mr. Riera said that he had recruited scores of Mexican informants, including officials, businessmen, intelligence officers and journalists.
Among the successes he claimed was a 1989 operation, code-named "Lupa," or "Magnifying Glass," in which he said he obtained the correspondence of recruited C.I.A. agents in Mexico. Another operation was code-named "Moncada," in which he said he used a renegade C.I.A. officer, Philip Agee, to try to recruit the secretary of the deputy chief of the C.I.A. station in Mexico City. United States intelligence officials have described the operation as a total failure, saying Mr. Agee, who broke publicly with the C.I.A. in the 1970's and is regarded by the agency as a traitor, was quickly identified, and his approach rebuffed. Mr. Agee did not return an e-mail sent to his office in Cuba on Tuesday.
Mr. Riera said he had worked with Mr. Agee for years. He said the work began in 1973, when he was a liaison between Mr. Agee and the Cuban Politburo, when Mr. Agee was writing a book exposing C.I.A. secrets. Mr. Riera said that he conveyed suggestions from the government about what information Mr. Agee should disclose in his book. He said telephone numbers for C.I.A. officials in the United States Embassy in Mexico City provided by Mr. Agee proved useful to Cuba years later, when Mr. Riera was posted here, helping him identify which embassy personnel were C.I.A. officers.
United States officials have not commented on Mr. Riera's case, other than a statement from the American Embassy in Mexico City expressing concern about his fate in Cuba.
After a number of overseas assignments, including one in 1977 in which he said he persuaded President Samora Machel to throw C.I.A. personnel out of Mozambique, Mr. Riera said he was assigned by his bosses in Cuba's General Directorate of Intelligence to draw up a manual to instruct Cuban spies about how best to infiltrate the C.I.A.
The manual, "Methodology for Recruitment of C.I.A. Staff Personnel," became a standard training tool for Cuban agents, he said. It demanded personal and psychological profiles of potential recruits to pinpoint weaknesses and vulnerabilities. And it advised using money, not ideology, to lure C.I.A. personnel into collaborating.
Mr. Riera was proud of what he regarded as highly effective work by Cuban intelligence against the C.I.A. during his service. He accused Mr. Castro of destroying the Cuban agency by turning it to his political ends.
Mr. Riera, who is 49, joined the Cuban directorate as a teenager in 1969, the documents show. He was recalled to Cuba in 1992 and stepped down from active duty a year later, with the rank of major. He remains on reserve.
In conversations with The Times, Mr. Riera said that he did not want to seek exile in the United States, but hoped for safe haven in Mexico. Reuters reported today from Havana that Mr. Riera was back in Cuba but his whereabouts were not known.
Mexican officials gave conflicting accounts about Mr. Riera's deportation. The Foreign Ministry confirmed that two senior officials there met with Mr. Riera in recent weeks to hear his safe haven request. Foreign Minister Rosario Green said through her spokesman that she turned the matter over to the Interior Ministry, which handles both national security and immigration.
But José Ángel Pescador Osuna, the Interior Ministry's top official for immigration, said today that he had heard nothing about Mr. Riera from the Foreign Ministry and had no record of an asylum request. He said Mr. Riera was deported because he did not produce a valid Mexican visa.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Dom Abr 27, 2008 9:17 am


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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

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