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Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

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Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Vie Feb 01, 2008 5:26 pm

Recuerdo del primer mensaje :

Miami Herald
July 3, 1982
Agents seize satellite equipment bought by Cuban U.N. diplomat



By GUILLERMO MARTINEZ

Federal agents in Orlando have seized $38,000 worth of satellite monitoring equipment purchased by a top-ranking Cuban diplomat in violation of the U.S. Trading with the Enemy Act, a Customs Department spokesman announced Friday.
A Cuban diplomat at the United Nations purchased the equipment from a Florida company by mail, according to Ed Kittredge, a U.S. Customs Department spokesman in Washington.
The equipment was seized Thursday by FBI agents and the U.S. Customs Service in a United Parcel Service warehouse in Orlando.
Federal agencies are checking into the possibility that the equipment might be used for spying, said a State Department official who would talk only if his name was not used.
"It is still premature to say" if the violation of the 20-year embargo on trading with Cuba is serious enough to warrant the expulsion of the diplomat, the official added.
"After the investigation we will see what we do," he said.
The equipment, which is available commercially, can be converted to a sophisticated telecommunications monitor, according to officials at Customs. They added it did not include a receiving "dish," commonly used to pick up television signals from satellites.
Kittredge said the name of the company selling the equipment is not being divulged "because they are cooperating with us."
The incident is the first involving a Cuban diplomat since February of last year, when the Reagan Administration expelled Ricardo Escartin, first secretary in the Cuban Interests Section in Washington.
Escartin was accused of engaging in "intelligence gathering activities" and conspiring with American businessmen to violate the embargo on trade with Cuba.
Customs officials said that the Cuban diplomat involved in the latest incident could not be arrested because he is covered by diplomatic immunity.
Officials at the State Department refused to identify the diplomat Friday. Kittredge said they could not identify him because "the State Department told us not to."
An official of Cuba's Interests Section in Washington said the Cuban government had not been officially notified of the incident and thus he could not comment.
A woman who answered the phone at the Cuban mission to the United Nations in New York also declined comment saying, "Here we are not accustomed to make any statements to the press."

Miami Herald

February 27, 1982, page 1
Spies in Miami?
Castro sent 300 of them, defector testifies
By JIM McGEE
WASHINGTON - An estimated 300 Cuban intelligence agents entered South Florida during and since the Mariel boatlift, a congressional subcommittee was told Friday.
If that is true, said a former Cuban spy testifying before the subcommittee, the agents are probably here to "distract" the FBI.
"One of the objectives is to distract the counterintelligence services of the United States," said former Cuban spy Gerardo Peraza, 42, -who quit the Cuban intelligence service in 1971 and defected to the United States.
There "is no possibility of detecting the true agents. The FBI doesn't have time to detect the real agents," Peraza said through an interpreter.
The comment came after subcommittee chairman Sen. Jeremiah Denton (R., Ala.), a conservative Republican, said congressional investigators have been told "there are now 300 [Cuban intelligence[ officers and agents in the Miami area alone" who have arrived during and since Mariel.
Subcommittee investigators said their information about Florida came from the FBI and local law enforcement agencies. FBI officials declined to comment for The Herald on Peraza's testimony.
Peraza said Cuba's intelligence agency, the General Directorate for Intelligence (DGI), relied on the Soviet Union for training and equipment.
"The Soviet Union utilizes Cuba because of its great possibilities in the intelligence field against the U.S.," Peraza said, " . . . and the great possibilities of penetrating the U.S."
Later in the hearings, which focused on Peraza's experiences, Denton's staff produced a photograph of Russian-made hand grenades that he said have been linked to three Miami-area bombings. The Russian grenades were apparently stolen from a shipment of arms from Cuba to El Salvador, a Florida investigator said.
Staff investigators showed the photograph of the smooth, hand-held cylinders and said they interviewed a jailed informant who claimed the grenades were intended "to blow things up" in Miami.
"We went down there [to Miami] to talk to a guy in prison," said a member of the subcommittee staff who asked not to be named. "This guy was given the hand grenades . . . they were sent over [from Cuba] to be used by him.
"This guy was specifically told to blow things up. He was told by a guy who thought he was, or believed to be, a [Cuban agent] to do this."
State and federal law enforcement officials confirmed Friday afternoon that Russian-made devices have been used in Miami bombings.
The most recent incident occurred last Monday when an explosion rocked the neighborhood at NW 27th Ave and 16th Terrace.
"We know where they came from," said Sergio Pinon, and investigator with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. "We know how they got to the U.S. from Cuba."
Peraza, speaking in Spanish, said he left Cuba 12 years ago in protest of a requirement that intelligence officers join the Communist Party and because the Cuban agency had been placed under the control of Soviet intelligence.
He said the USSR, in taking command of the agency, was interested primarily in "the penetration of United States intelligence."
In introducing the swarthy, heavy-set former spy, Denton said he was placed in charge of the signals bureau in the DGI in 1967 to monitor counterrevolutionary activities among Cuban exiles. Denton said he was later assigned to the Cuban embassy in London with the cover title of second secretary.
Throughout his testimony, Peraza stressed that the United States was uppermost in the minds of Cuban and Soviet intelligence leaders.
Even when the DGI would try to recruit British officials, he said, the goal was to hurt America.
"It was to utilize these people in one way or another to penetrate the U.S.," Peraza said. " . . . All the other countries where they work, it is [directed] at the U.S."
Peraza said he made the decision to defect after watching Cuban intelligence become more and more a KGB operation.
He told of attending Russian training centers for spies - where he studied beside recruits from other Third World nations.
"We [the Cuban trainees] were the apple of their eyes," he said of his Soviet trainers. "The preferred ones. We had more access to information."
Peraza also said Cuba began establishing training centers - which were essentially schools for terrorism.
"Thousands of terrorists have gone through that school for special training," he said.
Shifting his focus to New York and Washington, Peraza said most of the Cuban diplomats are trained intelligence agents. He said the general orders are to gather political, economic and military information about the U.S.
He said a leftist student group in Florida, the Venceremos Brigade, performed a similar function.
"Venceremos" is Spanish for "We shall win." The pro-Castro youth brigade was made up of American college students who made annual "solidarity" visits to Cuba to cut sugar cane and work the construction industry in the 1970s.
"The Venceremos Brigade helped by sending the telephone books [of Florida communities] and [other] information, including [data] on the U.S. Senate," Peraza said.
For one period, he said, there was "and extraordinary emphasis placed on several senators of the U.S. … with some success."
He did not name the senators.
Near the end of the morning session, Sen. John East (R., N.C.) asked a final question.
"You see the Soviet-DGI connection as alive and well in the United States?"
"Yes," the ex-spy said.


The Miami Herald
April 25, 1983, page 1-D
Castro agents on Miami force, says Carollo
When Sen. Paula Hawkins and a Senate subcommittee get to Miami Saturday for a hearing on Cuba's involvement in drug smuggling, they're going to get an earful.
For one thing, Miami City Commissioner Joe Carollo is willing to tell them there are Castro agents on the Miami police force.
"I'm extremely sure there are Miami police officers working for Communist Cuba," he says. Carollo says he bases the charge on information from the turncoat agents of the Direccion General de Inteligencia (DGI), Castro's version of Russia's KGB. The agents' purpose is to harass anti-Castro activists and inhibit efforts of the President's anti-drug task force, Carollo says.
Miami Police Chief Kenneth Harms declined to comment on Carollo's charge. Carollo and Harms, it should be noted, have been feuding for years.
Saturday's hearing, at 9 a.m. at the Dade County Courthouse, was called by the U.S. Senate subcommittee on national security and terrorism, which is seeking to involve Hawkins' Senate Drug Enforcement Caucus more actively in probing the Castro-cocaine connection.


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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Lun Feb 11, 2008 5:00 pm

The Miami Herald
October 22, 1998


Couple admit role in Cuban spy ring
By CAROL ROSENBERG
Herald Staff Writer
A husband and wife pleaded guilty Wednesday to being part of a Cuban spy ring,
bringing to five the number of people who have admitted roles in the case.
Prosecutors promised Joseph Santos, 37, and his wife, Amarylis Silverio Santos,
37,
that in return for the pleas they would argue against any effort to deport Mrs.
Santos to her native Cuba. Her husband was born in the United States.
A portion of the agreement was kept secret until an unspecified ``personal security
issue'' is resolved. U.S. District Judge Joan Lenard whispered the secret clause to
the couple out of public earshot. Defense attorneys Gary Kollin and Alvin Entin
and Assistant U.S. Attorney Caroline Heck Miller declined to comment.
Five more defendants, including three whose real identities are unknown, still face
trial. Miller would not say whether she expects more guilty pleas.
The Santoses pleaded guilty to charges they conspired to become unregistered
agents of a foreign government. They could face five years in jail, one year
probation and a $250,000 fine.
Miller said the couple was recruited as intelligence agents in Cuba and dispatched
to New Jersey in ``a nonactive capacity.''
Sometime in 1995, another ring
member, Nilo Hernandez, 44, visited them and ordered them to move to Miami.
Hernandez also has pleaded guilty.
The Santoses' main mission: To snoop around SouthCom, the Pentagon's Southern
Command headquarters, which directs U.S. military operations in Latin America
and the Caribbean.
They were also told to get jobs at SouthCom, which moved to
Miami-Dade from Panama over a year ago. They failed in that assignment.
Instead, Miller said the couple filled computer diskettes with ``voluminous
reporting'' about the military headquarters, including descriptions of the industrial
park area where SouthCom is located.

The Santoses stood somberly in court as they heard the government case through
an interpreter. Under painstaking questioning by Judge Lenard, they admitted their
guilt and signed a cooperation agreement that said they could get their sentences
reduced in exchange for ``substantial assistance'' to the U.S. government.
The agreement also included a promise by federal authorities to recommend
against Mrs. Santos' deportation if the Immigration and Naturalization Service --
another branch of the Justice Department -- decides to deport her. Mrs. Santos is
a green-card holder, but a felony conviction could cause her to lose it.
Prosecutors allege the ring was divided between three ``officers'' and seven
``sub-agents,'' including the Santos couple, who were known by the code names
Mario and Julia.
The officers came to this country from Cuba and took the identities of Americans
who died as infants, the prosecution claims. They are identified in court complaints
as John Does but lived in South Florida as Manuel Viramontes, 31, Luis Medina
III, 30, and Ruben Campa, 33.
They still face trial, as do Rene Gonzalez, former Brothers to the Rescue pilot, and
Antonio Guerrero, who allegedly used his civilian job at the U.S. Naval Air Station
at Boca Chica to gather information.

Defense attorneys and prosecutors are still dueling over what documents will be
released through discovery in the case. A hearing is scheduled for Nov. 2.
In addition to the Santoses and Hernandez, those who have pleaded guilty are
Hernandez's wife, Linda, 42, and Alejandro Alonso, 39.

Of the 10 people charged in the case, at least five were born in the United States
and another obtained U.S. citizenship more than 20 years ago.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Lun Feb 11, 2008 5:10 pm

The Miami Herald
September 15, 1998


Crackdown may signal new tactics
By JUAN O. TAMAYO
Herald Staff Writer
The arrests of 10 accused Cuban spies may signal a Washington decision to get
tough on Havana agents who can easily infiltrate Miami exile groups and provoke
incidents, exiles and intelligence experts say.
Exactly why the FBI arrested the 10 over the weekend remained unclear Monday.
One official in Washington said the agents moved in because some of the ring
members planned to leave the country. FBI officials in Miami declined to
comment.
But the roundup was the first in memory against alleged Cuban spies in Miami,
despite the fact that FBI officials and Cuban exile leaders have long maintained
that 200 to 300 Cuban agents operate in South Florida.

``I find it strange because the FBI usually doesn't jail those kinds of people. It just
watches them, said Francisco Avila, who in 1992 confessed to being a double
agent for the FBI and Cuban intelligence for 12 years.
FBI officials have argued in the past that it's better to simply monitor the known
Cuban agents than to arrest them -- and have Cuba replace them later with new
agents who would be harder to track down.

Little Havana was rife with speculation Monday that the crackdown was
Washington's way of balancing the scales of justice against the seven Cuban exiles
charged in Puerto Rico last month with trying to murder Fidel Castro.
``Absolutely not! said Lula Rodriguez, deputy assistant secretary of state for public
affairs. ``We have said time and time again the United States is committed to
investigate and, if warranted by the evidence, prosecute violations of the law -- be
it violations of laws on espionage or terrorism.
Cuba's concerted effort
But Cuban exiles were more concerned with what the criminal complaint filed by
the FBI on Monday showed: a concerted effort by Havana to penetrate exile
groups, sow dissent among them and provoke clashes between the exiles and
Washington and Havana.
One of the 10, Linda Hernandez, tried to join the Alpha 66 paramilitary group and
had a book autographed by its leader, Andres Nazario Sargen. Nazario said he
did not recognize her name and doubted that she ever got very close to the group.
Another alleged spy, Rene Gonzalez, tried to infiltrate Brothers to the Rescue and
offered to provide information to the FBI on the group's leader, Jose Basulto,
according to an FBI affidavit filed in support of the arrests.
A third accused spy, Alejandro Alonzo, infiltrated the Democracia Movement and
was ``tasked to report on the paramilitary PUND group, the National Cuban
Commission and the Cuban American Pilots Organization, the affidavit said.
While the affidavit gave few details, the descriptions of the spies' alleged activities
showed a Havana government intent on provoking problems for exile groups and
leaders.
Groups manipulated
Among the spies' duties, according to the affidavit: ``Duplicitous participation in
and manipulation of anti-Castro organizations; and attempted manipulation of
United States political institutions and government entities through disinformation
and pretended cooperation.

The spy ring's alleged master, Manuel Viramontes, was personally in charge of
agents assigned to inflitrate exile groups but left the infiltration of U.S. military
targets up to two deputies, the affidavit added.
Viramontes' focus was on ``the activities of Cuban exile groups in Miami and
tactics to disrupt those groups by, among other things, [creating] animosity
between specified groups and attempting to discredit certain individual leaders.

Also: ``The manipulation of the media, political institutions and public opinion,
including among other means, by suggested anonymous or misidentified telephone
calls and letters to media and political figures.

`Spark an action'
In one message from Viramontes to Rene Gonzalez, the FBI said, the ring's leader
said it might be ``of interest to us in an emergency to spark an action by the North
American government against these people.

Cuban intelligence infiltrations of Cuban exile groups in Miami are hardly new.
Alpha 6 alone has suffered more than a dozen known infiltrations since its founding
in the early 1960s -- the last and most embarrassing in 1992, when Avila, then
Alpha's military chief, revealed he had been working since 1980 for both the FBI
and Havana.
He was expelled from Alpha after his confession and lives in Miami.
On Monday, Avila recalled that his Cuban supervisors at the Cuban mission to the
United Nations had once given him $12,000 to buy a boat later offered to Alpha
66 for armed raids on Cuba.
``Cuba is very good at self-aggression, said Avila. ``If they want you to attack
they will clear out their Navy so you can go in.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Lun Feb 11, 2008 5:13 pm

CNN
September 17, 1998


FBI: Suspected Cuban spies' plans found on computer disks
MIAMI (AP) -- The shadowy world of a low-budget Cuban spy ring came
to light in a courtroom, where an FBI agent testified that a suspect's
apartment yielded computer diskettes containing coded references to Fidel
Castro and plans to sabotage an aircraft hangar.

Sounding more and more like a spy novel, details of the group's workings
were revealed in a hearing at which Luis Medina and Manuel Viramontez
were ordered held without bail Wednesday.
Thousands of pages of encrypted computer documents were seized from the
men's apartments.
The men were among 10 rounded up over the weekend and charged
Monday with trying to penetrate U.S. military bases, infiltrate anti-Castro
exile groups and manipulate U.S. media and political organizations.
Prosecutors said it was the biggest Cuban spy ring uncovered in the United
States since Castro took power in 1959.
However, the Pentagon said none of the alleged spies obtained U.S. secrets.
Evidence seized from Viramontez "analyzes the ability to sabotage or cause
damage to airplanes" or a Florida hangar itself," FBI agent Mark de Almeida
testified.
But the network was a low-budget affair, with a Cuban military captain who
lived under the alias Viramontez falling behind on his rent.
The Cuban government "indicated they were supposed to suffer like the rest
of the Cuban people," de Almeida testified in explaining their spartan
lifestyle.
He said diskettes seized from Viramontez' apartment were sprinkled with the
word "comrade" and coded references to "commandante," taken by
investigators to refer to Castro.
Before Viramontez was caught, he had three sets of false identities and plans
to escape to Mexico, Nicaragua or Canada, prosecutors allege.
Medina,
said to be a Cuban intelligence major, was ready to flee with a briefcase
containing Puerto Rican identities, a fake birth certificate and $5,000 in cash.

Eight defendants postponed their bail hearings Wednesday. All 10 were in
solitary confinement at a federal jail.
Viramontez's attorney Paul McKenna said the court, not public opinion,
must decide the case.
"You can't have a lynch mob mentality about this case," said McKenna. "We
have to let our system of justice, our courts, deal with this."
Copyright 1998 The Associated Press.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Lun Feb 11, 2008 5:19 pm

USA Today
September 15, 1998


Feds arrest 10 on Cuba-spying charge
MIAMI - Ten people were charged Monday in what prosecutors said
is the largest Cuban spy ring ever uncovered in the United States since
Fidel Castro came to power nearly 40 years ago.

The eight men and two women tried to penetrate U.S. military bases,
infiltrate anti-Castro groups and manipulate U.S. media and political
groups, federal investigators said Monday.

The FBI said one of the group's targets was the Miami-based U.S.
Southern Command, which runs American military operations in Latin
America and the Caribbean.
"In scope and in depth, this case, it is really unparalleled in recent
years," said U.S. Attorney Thomas E. Scott."This spy ring was cast by
the Cuban government to strike at the very heart of our national security
system and our very democratic process."

The Cuban foreign ministry in Havana had no comment.
The suspects were held without bond and face charges of espionage
and acting as unregistered agents of the Cuban government.
Prosecutors said the investigation is continuing, but would not say if
more arrests were anticipated.
Charges against five of the suspects carry life sentences. Charges
against the other five have maximum sentences of 15 years
One of the suspects, Linda Hernandez, was said to be part of a
husband-wife spy team. Both she and her husband are members of the
Cuban military and longtime operatives, the FBI said. Her lawyer,
Vincent Farina, said his client is a housewife, not a spy.
"She had nothing to do with this whatsover," Farina said.
According to an FBI affidavit filed in support of the arrests, surveillance
dating back to 1995 indicated all 10 members operated with code
names and had escape plans and alibis.
FBI agent Raul Fernandez said in the affidavit that the spy group was
led by Manuel Viramontes, a Cuban military captain, and used
computers with coded material on disk to communicate with each
other.
Viramontes had an apartment in Miami and it was there that the disks
were found, investigators said.
The disks provided a detailed overview of spy operations reminiscent
of Cold War-era espionage, including references to agents as
comrades.
"To say the least, folks, this operation was sophisticated," Scott said.
Two of those arrested were identified as U.S. citizens and one as a
resident alien. The citizenship of the others was not released, but the
FBI said some were agents who slipped in and out of the United
States.
Congressional sources said the arrests made without incident Saturday
were timed to avert an operation planned by the suspects. They
provided no further details.
Part of the operation focused on infiltrating six exile groups, according
to the FBI.
Among those arrested was Rene Gonzalez, who was formerly affiliated
with the Miami-based Cuban exile group Brothers to the Rescue. The
group is known for flying mercy flights over the 90 miles of open water
between Florida and Cuba, searching for rafters fleeing the communist
island nation.
Gonzalez has been linked more recently to the group Democracy
Movement, which sails flotillas in the Florida Straits to protest Cuba
government actions.
"This is the tip of the iceberg," said Jose Basulto, founder of Brothers to
the Rescue.
Four Brothers fliers, including three Americans, were killed in February
1996 when their two planes were shot down by a Cuban MiG fighter
jet over international waters.
Soon afterward, federal officials acknowledged they were looking into
whether Cuban spies played any part in the aerial attack, which was not
mentioned in the FBI affidavit.
The affidavit said two of the suspects set up a surveillance of the
Southern Command, MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa and the Boca
Chica Naval Air Station in Key West.

The two allegedly produced detailed reports, complete with photos, on
the Southern Command and were assigned to report any "unusual
exercises, maneuvers, and other activity related to combat readiness at
the Naval air station."

One of the suspects was said to have reported on daily activities at
Boca Chica, including types of aircraft being deployed and descriptions
of a facility suspected of being prepared for top secret activity.
Although the affidavit summary said the suspects tried to manipulate the
media, there was no elaboration on how that happened.
By The Associated Press

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Lun Feb 11, 2008 5:24 pm

The Miami Herald
May 8, 1999
GERARDO HERNANDEZ At last, prosecutors say, the U.S. government knows his real name.
The alleged ringleader of a troop of Cuban spies living in Miami -- known here by a
name he is accused of stealing from a child who died in Texas three decades ago
-- was identified Friday as Gerardo Hernandez, promoted to captain in the Cuban
military for his role in four killings, a Miami grand jury says.

Through his attorney, Paul McKenna, he denies any knowledge or involvement in
the Cuban attack on Brothers to the Rescue planes in 1996.
``I can't believe this,'' McKenna said. ``We doubt the government can prove any of
this.''
A mild-mannered, inconspicuous man who paid $580 per month for a $600 Miami
Beach apartment because he said he couldn't afford the rent, Hernandez used the
name Manuel Viramontes.
In September, prosecutors called him the mastermind of a plot to infiltrate
anti-Castro exile groups. Now they say he was at the center of a plot by the
Cuban government that led to a deadly confrontation with planes from Brother to
the Rescue.
He passed himself off as a Texas-born single man, although federal agents say
he wrote to a wife in Cuba on their eighth wedding anniversary.
According to federal authorities, he arrived in the United States in 1992 with
orders to infiltrate the U.S. Southern Command and discredit Cuban exile groups
by manipulating the media and political institutions through a smear campaign.
He made few friends, isolating himself in Apartment 305 at 18100 Atlantic Blvd. in
Northeast Dade.

Codename ``Giro,'' the feds say, he had a doctored U.S. passport, Puerto Rican
voter identification in the name of Manuel Viramontes Hernandez, a Mexican
driver's license in the name of Manuel Viramontes Hdez
and a Texas birth
certificate for Manuel Viramontes issued in 1994, records say.

Authorities say he used coded messages and a fake Puerto Rican accent to
order a ring of infiltrators to provide information that led to the Brothers
shoot-down.
-- DAVID KIDWELL

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Lun Feb 11, 2008 5:31 pm

The Miami Herald
November 14, 1998
Identities of 3 accused spies still elude feds
By CAROL ROSENBERG
Herald Staff Writer
More than a month after prosecutors declared them ``John Does,'' federal
authorities are still unable to identify three accused members of a Cuban spy ring
that operated for several years in South Florida.
Arrested Sept. 15 as Manuel Viramontes, 31, Luis Medina III, 30, and Ruben
Campa, 33, all claiming U.S. citizenship, the U.S. Attorney's office classified them
as John Doe 1, 2 and 3, in their subsequent Oct. 2 indictment that alleges they
were agents of the government of Fidel Castro.

``Only they and Fidel know who they really are,'' said John Schlesinger of the U.S.
Attorney's Office on Friday.

``They're still being carried as John Does,'' added FBI Special Agent Mike
Fabregas.
Prosecutors argued in court that all three men are actually masquerading in the
identities of U.S. citizens who died as young boys in Texas, presumably people of
Hispanic heritage who would not have relatives in South Florida. Not only did they
allegedly assume their names, but they supposedly took their birthdays as well, a
mechanism that allowed them to obtain birth certificates.

Investigators, they said, believe the three men are actually Cuban citizens posing as
Americans.
In the case of the man who calls himself Viramontes, Deputy U.S. Attorney
Caroline Heck Miller alleged in court that federal agents believe from their analysis
of his personal documents that he has a wife of 10 years still living in Cuba.
Further, she said, FBI wiretaps of his home determined that, while he spoke in
Spanish on the telephone he assumed a Puerto Rican accent, but inside his home
he spoke with a Cuban accent.

And in the case of the man who calls himself Medina, Deputy U.S. Attorney Guy
Lewis alleged that he is in fact a major in the Cuban military whose real
first name is Ramon.
Authorities in court surmised this by watching videotape of the
suspect, which they believed was shot in Cuba, in which people call him
``Ramon.''
Defense attorneys for two of the men -- Paul McKenna for John Doe 1 and Eric
Cohen for John Doe 2 -- say their clients steadfastly maintain that they are who
they claim to be, Viramontes and Medina. Federal public defender Joaquin
Mendez, who represents John Doe 3, could not be reached for comment despite
repeated attempts.
At issue is, if the men are not U.S. citizens, how and when they arrived in South
Florida -- and who helped them.
Did they come with valid U.S. immigration documents and then assume new
identities? Or did they arrive illegally -- perhaps during the 1994 rafter crisis when
Cuban migrants overwhelmed South Florida's shores?
Prosecutors consider the three men to be leaders of the 10-member ring that
allegedly snooped on Cuban American interest groups and tried to monitor the
Miami-Dade activity at the Pentagon's U.S. Southern Command headquarters,
which controls all U.S. troop activity in the Southern Hemisphere.

The trio face a September 1999 trial, along with Rene Gonzalez, 42, and Antonio
Guerrero, 39
, who were both born in the United States. All are accused of
conspiring to act as agents of a foreign government, Cuba, without registering with
Attorney General Janet Reno. John Does 1 and 2 and Guerrero are also accused
of conspiring to pass along U.S. national defense information to Cuba.
Five other people arrested as ring members have pleaded guilty to lesser charges,
carrying punishments ranging from five to 10 years in prison. Sentencing is
expected in September 1999 as well. Their guilty plea agreements suggest they are
cooperating with federal authorities as they develop their cases against the other
five.

All 10 people, two of them women, are in jail.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 2:42 pm

CNN
October 20, 1998


In rare admission, Castro says Cuba has dispatched spies across U.S.
From Havana Bureau Chief Lucia Newman
OPORTO, Portugal (CNN) -- Fidel Castro has admitted to sending spies
to the United States to gather information about "terrorist activities"
by anti-Castro political groups, but the Cuban leader denied there were
any attempts to spy on the U.S. military.
In an exclusive interview to be broadcast Tuesday on CNN's WorldView,
Castro said, "Yes, we have sometimes dispatched Cuban citizens to the
United States to infiltrate counterrevolutionary organizations, to inform us
about activities that are of great interest to us."
"I think we have the right to do this," he said. "The United States has spies in
industrial quantities."
The comments were believed to be the first time the Cuban leader has made
such an admission.
Ten alleged Cuban spies were arrested in Florida last month in what
authorities say is the largest Cuban spy ring uncovered in the United States
since Castro came to power in 1959.
They were charged with trying to penetrate U.S. military bases, infiltrate
anti-Castro exile groups and manipulate U.S. media and political
organizations.
Castro made his comments during an interview in Portugal, where he was
attending the Ibero-American summit. He was responding to a question
about the arrests, acknowledging that Cuba placed spies in the United
States.
"What information in the United States is it that interests us? One bit of
information exclusively -- one thing fundamentally -- and that is the
information about the terrorist activities against Cuba. The information about
sabotage plans," he said.
Castro, however, denied sending spies to collect information on the U.S.
military.
"We aren't interested in strategic matters, nor are we interested in
information about military bases," Castro said.
But he said movements of U.S. military near Cuba would be of interest if the
moves "translate into an act of aggression against Cuba. But we know that at
this time that is not the fundamental thinking of the U.S. government."
There was no immediate comment from the State Department late Monday.
Fernando Rojas, spokesman for the Cuban American National Foundation,
an anti-Castro lobbying group based in Miami, said the interview with
Castro was further evidence the Cuban leader continues to be a threat to
U.S. national security.

"He's now admitting to the fact he's exporting violence here to the shores of
the United States,"
Rojas said.
Three of the 10 arrested on espionage charges have pleaded guilty to being
an agent of a foreign government without notifying the U.S. Attorney
General. The charge is punishable by a maximum penalty of 10 years in
federal prison and a $250,000 fine.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 2:44 pm

The Miami Herald
February 12, 1999
'John Doe' spying suspect identified
By CAROL ROSENBERG
Herald Staff Writer
For months they have been John Doe No. 1 and John Doe No. 2 -- two men
accused by the U.S. government of operating here as spies for Fidel Castro.
Now federal agents believe they know the real name of one of them.
But they're not telling -- not the men's lawyers, not the news media, not the public.
They won't even say which of the two men they've identified -- the man who was
known as Manuel Viramontes, 32, or the one known as Luis Medina III, 30.
FBI agents arrested the two on Sept. 15 along with eight others. The 10 were
accused of spying on Cuban exile organizations and trying to infiltrate such widely
disparate targets as the Pentagon's Southern Command and CAMACOL, the
Latin American Chamber of Commerce.
Five have pleaded guilty to lesser charges of acting as unregistered agents of a
foreign country. They are expected to turn state's evidence at the September trial
of the other five, who include three "John Does.''
Besides John Does 1 and 2, also facing trial are John Doe No. 3, who was
arrested as Ruben Campa, 33; former Brothers to the Rescue Pilot Rene
Gonzalez, 42, and Antonio Guerrero, who was a civilian employee at the Boca
Chica Naval Air Station, near Key West.
According to a footnote of a filing found in the federal case record Thursday,
prosecutors Caroline Heck Miller and Guy Lewis say FBI agents as long ago as
November ``had determined the true identity'' of either John Doe No. 1, who was
arrested as Viramontes, and accused of being the team's spy master; or of John
Doe No. 2, who was arrested as Medina and shared a Hollywood apartment with
Campa.
But both prosecutors and FBI spokesman Mike Fabregas on Thursday refused to
say which John Doe had been identified -- or reveal his true identity.
Lawyers for both men, meantime, said they had not been notified by the U.S.
attorney's office that one of their clients had been identified. "As far as we're
concerned, he's still Manuel Viramontes. No one has told me anything different,''
defense attorney Paul McKenna said.
Federal authorities have claimed in court hearings that the three "John Does'' had
taken their identities from the names and birth dates of American-born children
who died long ago in Texas.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 2:46 pm

The Miami Herald
May 8, 1999
Juan Pablo Roque
Juan Pablo Roque -- an exercise-obsessed, former Cuban MiG-23 pilot who defected in 1992 by swimming across
Guantanamo Bay and quickly ingratiated himself with tales of corruption and inefficiency in the Cuban military -- stunned
everyone when he suddenly went back to Cuba within days after Brothers to the Rescue planes were attacked.
It quickly became clear -- even to his stunned American wife -- he had been a convincing double agent all along.
Even the FBI had hired the spy to spy for them, paying him thousands for information on Brothers to the Rescue.
He even wrote a book about his defection from Cuba entitled Deserter, published by the Cuban American National Foundation, which called comrades ''fat communists, heavy beer drinkers.''
He said he left behind a girlfriend and a son.
Roque quickly brought himself into contact with other former members of the Cuban armed forces who were now in the U.S. He founded the Support Center for Cuban Military, which used a shortwave radio to broadcast messages urging the
Cuban military not to take up arms against the people in the event of a democratic uprising. After he appeared on Cuban television within days after he disappeared, authorities began to wonder for what else he used that radio.
He publicly denounced the exile pilot organization, accusing it of planning terrorist acts, including the assassination of Fidel Castro and said he had returned to Cuba to reveal to the world ''the true nature of Brothers to the Rescue.''
--DAVID KIDWELL

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 2:50 pm

The Miami Herald
May 17, 2000

Jury selection begins in suspected spy's trial
BY DAVID KIDWELL
Nine jurors -- including four Cuban immigrants -- were selected Tuesday in the
federal espionage trial of Mariano Faget, the immigration officer charged with
passing a government secret to a friend with alleged ties to
Cuba.
The remaining three jurors and two alternate jurors are expected to be selected
this morning, and opening arguments are expected to begin this afternoon.
Faget, 54, faces about five years in federal prison if convicted in a four-count
indictment alleging he passed a classified secret to a lifelong friend and lied about
his meetings with Cuban intelligence officers and his business dealings.

Federal authorities argue Faget leaked information to help cultivate business
relationships with powerful Cubans for the day when the U.S. embargo is
eventually lifted. FBI agents watching officials from the Cuban Interests Section
first began to suspect Faget early last year when he showed up at an after-hours
meeting with a Cuban official at a Miami night spot.
In February, the FBI conducted a sting operation on Faget. Faget was asked to
prepare top secret immigration documents for what the FBI told him was a
high-level Cuban defector. Twelve minutes later, he telephoned a lifelong friend
and business partner in Washington to tell him about it.
That friend, Pedro Font, was set to meet with Cuban officials that day.
Faget and his attorneys acknowledge a lapse in judgment, but argue the
information was never intended to be forwarded to Cuban spies and that Faget's
motives were harmless.
Concerns among attorneys about conducting Faget's trial in Miami-Dade County
-- because of anti-Castro sentiments and controversy over the Elian Gonzalez
seizure -- proved largely unfounded Tuesday.
Of the 22 jurors interviewed Tuesday, only two of Cuban descent were excluded
from serving because they told U.S. District Judge Alan Gold they would have
difficulty being fair to Faget because of their personal beliefs.
The nine jurors chosen Tuesday, all women, included an administrative assistant,
a hospital secretary, a retired cosmetologist, a Bell South customer service
representative, an auto parts saleswoman, a catering coordinator, a 25-year-old
physical therapy student at Miami-Dade Community College, a retired printing
press operator, and a Bell South sales and marketing representative.
Copyright 2000 Miami Herald

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 4:16 pm

The Miami Herald
February 12, 1999


Lawyer in Cuba spy tale clears security for U.S. nomination
By JUAN O. TAMAYO
Herald Staff Writer
The FBI has cleared a former White House volunteer entangled in rumors that
Cuban spies once tried to recruit her, and President Clinton will nominate her to a
top government job, officials say.
``The agents who vet people's backgrounds gave her a clean bill of health, White
House National Security Council spokesman Bob Nash said of Washington
lawyer Mari Carmen Aponte.
``There's a strong view, held by the President and other senior members of the
administration, that Miss Aponte is qualified and would make an excellent public
servant, he added.
Nash declined to comment further, but Clinton administration officials confirmed
that the President will soon appoint her to the Housing Finance Board, an agency
of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Aponte, 52, a Puerto Rico native and Hispanic community activist in Washington,
worked as a volunteer in the White House personnel office in 1993 and helped
raise campaign funds for Clinton in 1996.
Clinton had nominated Aponte as ambassador to the Dominican Republic last year
but she withdrew Oct. 25, citing ``personal reasons,'' after the spy tale began
circulating in Washington gossip circles.
Months earlier, the FBI had given her a top-security clearance for the
ambassadorial post even though the bureau was aware of the Cuban spy tale,
Clinton administration officials confirmed.
One Aponte friend said she withdrew after staffers at the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, chaired by Jesse Helms, R-N.C., vowed the panel would ask her
tough personal questions as part of her confirmation process. A committee
spokesman declined comment.
The spy tale dates back to 1993, when Florentino Aspillaga, an intelligence agent
with Cuba's Interior Ministry who had defected in 1987, told it to Miami's Diario
las Americas newspaper.
Without offering any evidence, Aspillaga alleged that Cuban spies were trying to
recruit Aponte through her Cuban-born boyfriend, Roberto Tamayo, who was
known to frequently visit the Cuban diplomatic mission in Washington.

What Aspillaga apparently didn't know was that Tamayo, a Washington
businessman, was also in contact with the FBI.
``Tamayo was a valuable source of information about some of the personalities
within the Cuban Interests Section,
retired FBI counterintelligence agent Ed Joyce
told The Washington Times last month.
Joyce confirmed to The Herald that The Times had accurately reported his
comments on Tamayo.
The story reported that Joyce ``questioned Mr. Tamayo regularly about his
contacts with Cuban officials . . . during the late 1980s. But [Joyce] did not believe
Mr. Tamayo was a professionally trained intelligence officer.
``Roberto was a fellow who had interests in all camps, the report quoted Joyce as
saying. ``The Cubans knew Roberto was talking to me . . . I was getting
information that I couldn't get other places.
Aponte's friends said that as soon as she learned of Aspillaga's allegations, she
went to the FBI to inquire about Tamayo, and later arranged a meeting between
him and the FBI agents.
She broke up with him in 1994, after he insisted on going on a trip to Cuba over
her objections, the friends said.
Aponte declined to comment for this story. Tamayo, who is said to be living in
Washington and working as an insurance salesman, could not be located for
comment.
Whether or not there was ever a Cuban attempt to recruit Aponte remains unclear.
Aponte has told friends she never perceived any such attempt, and one White
House official said it appeared that none took place.
``In the end, there was nothing at all, the official said.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 4:23 pm

The Miami Herald
September 17, 1998


Miscues blamed on military's takeover of Cuban spy agency
By JUAN O. TAMAYO
Herald Staff Writer
A Cuban spy ring's puzzling interest in U.S. military targets -- and its
ineffectiveness in carrying out its mission -- may lie in the Cuban military's takeover
of a civilian spy agency following a 1989 scandal and communism's fall, intelligence
experts say.
``This is not the way they used to operate, said one U.S. diplomat who has tangled
with Cuban intelligence in Latin America and the Middle East. ``These guys act
more like soldiers thrown into the deep end of the pool.
Paying the rent late and losing a computer containing codes, as the Miami suspects
apparently did, are not exactly hallmarks of Cuba's foreign intelligence agency, the
General Intelligence Directorate, better known as DGI.
Based in a drab Ministry of Interior building on the corner of 13th and I streets in
Havana's central Vedado neighborhood, the DGI and its counterintelligence twin
were long considered among the best in the world.
At one point in the 1980s, every single agent the CIA believed it had in Cuba
turned out to be a double agent working for Havana. And DGI was not far behind,
deploying or recruiting scores of agents around the world.
But DGI fell from grace after several Interior Ministry generals were implicated in
the drug scandal that led to the execution of army Gen. Arnaldo Ochoa and three
other army and Interior Ministry officers in 1989.

Almost at the same time, the collapse of the Soviet Bloc affected Cuba's main
source of strategic information on the U.S. military, said one senior Armed Forces
Ministry official who defected in 1993.
Cleaning house
President Fidel Castro fired DGI chief Gen. Luis Barreiro in 1989 and replaced
him with Gen. Jesus Bermudez Cutino, then intelligence chief at the Armed Forces
Ministry.
Now about 63 years old, Bermudez swiftly renamed DGI as the Intelligence
Directorate, or DI, fired many of its top operatives and stuffed his ranks with
military officers, the Armed Forces Ministry official said.
``Operatives with decades of experience were put on the street and replaced with
soldiers who had no subtlety, one of the purged Interior Ministry colonels still living
in Cuba told The Herald in 1995.
Bermudez is said to have brought back some of the old DGI hands in recent years
after a series of gaffes -- including Miami Channel 23's filming of a Cuban spy
meeting with one of his Miami agents in New York in 1992.
`Obsessed with Miami'
The old DGI's main target in the United States was always Cuban exile groups
viewed by Havana as dominating U.S. policy toward President Fidel Castro and,
at times, launching armed attacks against his government.
``They were obsessed with Miami. They wanted to know everything, what kind of
cigars people smoke, what cars they drive, said Francisco Avila, a Miamian who
worked 12 years for the FBI and the DGI. It was Avila who took the Channel 23
cameras to the New York meeting.
But the leaders of the 10 accused Cuban spies in Miami were tasked with spying
on the Boca Chica Naval Air Station in the Florida Keys, the U.S. Southern
Command in West Dade and MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, according to FBI
documents in the case.
Some also were under orders to infiltrate and disrupt Cuban exile groups such as
Brothers to the Rescue, the Democracy Movement, the Alpha 66 and PUND
paramilitary groups and even the Latin American Chamber of Commerce.
Failed mission
The ring seemed to have been singularly unsuccessful. Its members managed only
a low-level penetration of Boca Chica and the Democracy Movement but appear
to have failed to obtain any classified U.S. documents.
``These guys seem to be nothing, just walking proof of the Armed Forces
Ministry's hegemony over the Cuban intelligence apparatus these days, said the
U.S. diplomat.
``The military mentality still prevails in DI, said the Armed Forces Ministry
defector. ``And the military has this constant obsession . . . that Cuba is a place
besieged by the United States, in danger of being invaded or attacked at almost
any time.
``The United States may not be at war with Cuba, but Cuba is at war with the
United States, or at least it sees itself as being at war or potentially at war with the
United States every day, he added.
Whatever the reason for the spy ring's military targets, FBI and Justice Department
officials have yet to explain what made it so important as to become the first
Cuban spy gang rolled up in Miami in some four decades.
``Maybe it's far more simple than we can imagine, said one retired FBI
counterintelligence official. ``Maybe it's as simple as a matter of `a spy's gotta
spy.'

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 4:26 pm

The Miami Herald
December 23, 1998
Move may be tied to spying probe
By RUI FERREIRA
El Nuevo Herald
The U.S. government on Tuesday ordered the expulsion of three Cuban diplomats
at the United Nations, accusing them of ``activities incompatible with their status.''
The euphemism, created during the Cold War, usually means espionage.
According to several sources familiar with the subject, the action is a result of the
investigations conducted after 10 Cubans were arrested in South Florida in
September and charged with spying for the Cuban government.

Neither the names nor the positions of the three diplomats were disclosed.
In the language usually used in such cases, the U.S. government ``requested'' that
the Cuban government withdraw its functionaries as soon as possible, the sources
said.
One source said the Cuban government was notified early Tuesday and that it was
given until 5 p.m. to answer the allegations.
``There was no answer,'' the source said, one hour after the deadline.
Calls made late Tuesday to the Cuban Mission to the United Nations in New
York City were not returned. Neither were calls placed to the Cuban Interests
Section in Washington and to the Cuban Affairs Desk at the State Department.
``The State Department informed me this afternoon that three Cuban diplomats
would be expelled for espionage
and, quite frankly, the news didn't surprise me.
All of Castro's diplomats are spies,'' said Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., when
reached by El Nuevo Herald.
According to the lawmaker, the federal authorities told him the expulsion was
``imminent.'' The State Department also kept Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla.,
informed.
In 1992, the United States expelled a Cuban diplomat serving at the United
Nations after he was videotaped by a TV station chatting with the former military
chief of the anti-Castro group Alpha 66, Francisco Avila, in a New York City
restaurant. Avila was a double agent for the FBI and Cuba, and the Cuban
diplomat was his contact with Havana.
Of the 10 spies arrested in September, three of them -- Manuel Viramontes, Luis
Medina and Raul Campa -- are considered by authorities to be the network's
leaders, professional intelligence officers especially trained and sent to the United
States to carry out missions of recruitment and espionage.
Paul Mackenna, Viramontes' public defender, said he was surprised by the
expulsion of the three Cuban diplomats and their possible relationship with his
client's case.
``To tell you the truth, every day I find it more difficult to understand U.S. foreign
policy. I don't see how those diplomats could have anything to do with my client,''
he said. ``Let's hope there is an explanation for this, even though neither the FBI
nor anyone else warned me of these developments.''

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 4:29 pm

The Miami Herald
September 18, 1998


No one can match U.S. spying, Cuba retorts
From Herald Wire Services
HAVANA -- The Cuban government on Thursday accused the United States of
holding the world's record in espionage and declined again to acknowledge or
deny involvement in an alleged Cuban spy network uncovered in Miami.

``When it comes to espionage to subvert the political stability of other countries,
there are no world records like those amassed by the United States, especially in
the case of Cuba,'' a Foreign Ministry spokesman said during a press briefing.
Alejandro Gonzalez said that in the past four decades, Washington ``has been
carrying out all kinds of covert and overt acts against the security, stability and
well-being of the Cuban people.''
On Monday, the FBI announced in Miami that it had arrested 10 people and
charged them with providing the Cuban government with information about U.S.
military installations and Cuban exile organizations.

``This is not the first time that all kinds of accusations are made'' by the Americans,
Gonzalez said. They ``have called hundreds of people `spies' and have taken
action against them. . . . We are used to all types of campaigns from the United
States.''
The arrests have not been reported in the Cuban media.
Gonzalez said all he knew about the situation is what he read in the American
press, ``which we are watching.''
Asked if he would confirm or deny the FBI's allegations of espionage, he
answered: ``I have nothing more to say about this affair.''
On Tuesday, Foreign Minister Roberto Robaina told foreign journalists that he
would ``neither confirm nor deny [the charges] but simply listen, so I can come to
an opinion later.'' He told his listeners that ``that type of campaign, of manipulation,
of orchestration, of ballyhoo, is a specialty of the American press.''

Copyright © 1998 The Miami Herald

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 4:34 pm

The Miami Herald
October 6, 1998


Prosecutors seek to withhold papers
By DAVID KIDWELL
Herald Staff Writer
The criminal trials of 10 alleged Cuban spies could be delayed for months -- even
longer -- because of an infrequently used law that gives prosecutors the ability to
withhold secret documents vital to national security.
Defense attorneys face extensive -- some say intrusive -- personal background
checks, and prosecutors already have asked for delays in procedures that under
normal circumstances would force them to begin handing over evidence by
mid-October.
``We're all standing around like a bunch of idiots with literally nothing to do right
now,'' said Paul McKenna, defense attorney for alleged ring mastermind Manuel
``Giraldo'' Viramontes. ``The government has made these broad allegations, and it
appears we're not going to see any actual evidence for quite some time.''
All 10 suspects are being held in federal detention without bail on charges of
conspiracy and failing to register as a foreign agent.
Federal prosecutors Caroline Heck-Miller and Guy Lewis are expected to file a
motion this week seeking to keep certain records secret for national security
interests, Heck-Miller said during a hearing Monday. At the same hearing, eight of
the 10 suspected spies pleaded not guilty before U.S. Magistrate William Turnoff.
Even the motion itself, defense attorneys said, will be held under seal.
``It's kind of ironic,'' McKenna said. ``I've got to go explain all this to my client,
and I'm sure he won't be surprised. After all, he is from Cuba.''
Meanwhile, two suspects who were not arraigned Monday have been negotiating
a plea agreement,
as prosecutors maneuvered behind the scenes in attempts to
nudge cooperation.
The plea deal, which would have kept the husband/wife team of Nilo and Linda
Hernandez from being named in Friday's indictment, fell through late last week,
their attorneys said.

``Prosecutors are shopping deals and possibly flips,'' said Richard J. Diaz, who
represents Nilo Hernandez, 44. ``We listened, but in the end decided to reject the
offer. It would be malpractice for me to advise my client to plead guilty to a crime
when we haven't been afforded an opportunity yet to see the government's hard
evidence.''
Other defense attorneys suggest its a typical case of ``first rats to the cheese,'' a
saying attorneys use to describe the practice of defendants lowest in the criminal
hierarchy racing to cut early deals with prosecutors.
The 10 alleged Cuban spies were arrested last month in what authorities said was
a sophisticated -- although low budget -- conspiracy to infiltrate Cuban exile
groups and U.S. military installations and send information back to Cuba.
A federal grand jury on Friday indicted three on charges of conspiracy to deliver
national defense information to Cuba and seven others on much less serious
charges of acting as agents of Cuba without notifying the U.S. attorney general.
Defense attorneys rushed to point out that while the 19-page indictment alleges a
conspiracy, and specific acts of deception and attempts at infiltration, it does not
make any specific allegations of espionage, the actual transfer of sensitive
information to Communist Cuba.
``There are no substantive charges here at all,'' said Jack Blumenfeld, the
court-appointed attorney for Antonio Guerrero, one of three facing a life prison
sentence on the conspiracy charge. ``They have three years of wiretaps, room
bugs, even surreptitious entries -- burglaries -- and they don't have any specifics.''
The three-year federal investigation allegedly began after an alleged conspirator's
computer was stolen in a Los Angeles burglary and later was given to authorities, a
government assertion defense attorneys say they view with skepticism.
Defense attorneys for each of the alleged spies are also being forced to apply for
security clearance -- answering personal questions about unpaid bills, mental
health maladies or previous drug use -- before they are allowed to inspect
evidence.
It remains unclear what documents or evidence against the alleged spies would
remain secret. Prosecutors have been mum. But attorneys interviewed suggest that
the records in dispute will have to be reviewed in secret by Magistrate Turnoff,
who will make a decision how to handle sensitive evidence.
Defense attorneys in South Florida were asked to submit to similar procedures
during the 1992 trial of former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, when
sensitive documents were inspected in a secured basement at the federal
courthouse.
But aside from the inconvenience, some defense attorneys are lamenting an
invasion of privacy. ``The whole process is pretty extensive, and intrusive,'' said
Gary Kollin, a Fort Lauderdale attorney appointed to represent Amarylis Silverio.
``Especially with the kind of weak case they've got.
``What bothers me is that this could really grind everything to a halt for months,
while our clients sit in jail,'' he said.


Copyright © 1998 The Miami Herald

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 4:38 pm

The Miami Herald
March 12, 1999
Purported spy visited Miami often as courier
By RICK JERVIS
Herald Staff Writer
The man claiming to be a Cuban spy was a small-time courier who traveled to
Miami four days a month and made money by bringing back cash and gifts to
Cuba for exiles, according to his former landlord.
Percy Francisco Alvarado, who testified Thursday in Cuba that Cuban American
National Foundation officials paid him to detonate bombs around Havana, would
stay in a room in a Miami home and get visits from about 10 people a day.
They would bring radios, medicine or money. Alvarado, 49, would take them
back to their families in Cuba for a price, said Ricardo Dellano, owner of the home
in the 800 block of Northwest 32nd Avenue.
Alvarado had been shuttling between the home and his house in Miramar, Cuba,
for about a year, staying for only four days at a time, Dellano said. The Miami
homeowner allowed Alvarado to stay in the room for free, with the condition that
he would deliver things back to Dellano's family.
Dellano last saw Alvarado four months ago, he said.
``People came here a lot, men and women,'' Dellano said. ``But he never talked
about the foundation or anti-revolution or Castro. He was like a courier.''
CANF officials Thursday vehemently discounted Alvarado's claims that he
infiltrated the foundation and received money to act as an undercover agent in
Cuba.
``Where's the evidence?'' CANF spokeswoman Ninoska Perez said from
Washington. ``We don't know who this person is. We've never heard of him. We
have repeatedly said we are not involved in those types of activities.''
Alvarado, a native of Guatemala, had lived in Cuba since 1960.
Recommended to Dellano through a friend, he would show up in Miami late on the
first Thursday of every month and stay through Monday, Dellano said.
In that span, people would come to see him throughout the day like clockwork,
many of them by appointments, he said.
``He scheduled them very carefully, never two at a time,'' Dellano said.
Alvarado would receive $50 to $500 from people to take back to families,
keeping some for himself, he said. Sometimes it was medicine, sometimes sandals.
When not meeting with people, Alvarado would go to the Opa-locka flea market
to buy VCRs or watches to sell back in Cuba.
Dressed in shorts and sandals, Alvarado was thrifty, eating home-cooked meals
and asking for rides to the flea market or airport because he couldn't afford cab
fare, Dellano said.
He would watch soccer on television and go to sleep early, he said.
Once, when news of the Havana bombings came on television, Alvarado
commented on how the ``damn terrorists'' were going to ruin his business.
``He didn't like to talk about politics,'' Dellano said. ``Soccer, women and making
a buck, that's all he talked about.''

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Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 4:40 pm

The Miami Herald
May 8, 1999
Relatives: Charges fall short
By ELAINE DE VALLE
Herald Staff Writer
At first, family members and friends of the four fallen fliers from Brothers to the
Rescue felt joyous relief at the announcement of the indictment of a group of
alleged Cuban spies in connection with the deaths.
''Oh my God! That is so great,'' exclaimed the frail mother of Pablo Morales, who
got the news from a Herald reporter.
Then, the skepticism set in immediately: ''Do you think there will really be
justice?'' Eva Barbas asked.
Parents of the two pilots killed also said they were happy about the news, but
that they wanted more.
''It should not stop here. They should indict Castro and the pilots,'' said Mario de
la Peña, who lost his son and namesake.
''It all depends on whether this government wants to stop right here for political
reasons or whether they want to do justice. If they stop now, we will know it was
all politics,'' he said.
Mirta Costa, the mother of pilot Carlos Costa, said she could not understand the
delay.
''We know their names. We know who gave the order. Fidel Castro himself took
responsibility. They need to suffer.''
Said Barbas: ''All we want is justice, not just for my son and his friends, but for
the thousands who have died at the hands of Fidel.
''He is smeared with blood.''
Brothers founder Jose Basulto, the pilot of the sole surviving Cessna that day,
applauded ''any action no matter how small to bring whoever did this to justice.''
But he said the spies were bit players and that justice would not be done until
others -- in Cuba and the U.S. -- were charged.
''These guys are just the mechanics,'' Basulto said. ''We want the architect of this
assassination, who is Fidel Castro, to be indicted in Florida courts.''
He said the United States government, which he claims allowed the shootdown to
happen, is also responsible for the deaths. ''I would also like to see the people on
this side of the Florida Straits who made it possible for there to be no defense,
who let Fidel Castro have the state of Florida all to himself for an hour, to see
them be brought to justice too,'' Basulto said.
Basulto has long said that someone in the U.S. government gave an order to
''depart from standard operating procedure'' that day and not respond with military
interceptors after the Cuban MiGs crossed a particular point, an accusation the
U.S. has rejected.
Family members also stressed that the joy of promised justice could never
eclipse the pain they feel still over their loss.
At the Costas' Hialeah household, pilot Carlos Costa's old bedroom has barely
been touched. His books are still on the table. His clothes are still in the closet.
A notebook with random things he jotted down, messages and phone numbers,
lays on his desk, open to the last page he used.
''I don't think I can ever get rid of anything,'' his mother said. ''Sometimes, I give
myself the idea he's still here, because the reality is very hard.''
Barbas said she welcomes death so it can end the pain.
''I am waiting for my life to finish so I can be with Pablito again.''

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Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 4:51 pm

The Miami Herald
April 11, 1999


Spies among us

Castro agents keep eye on exiles
By JUAN O. TAMAYO
Herald Staff Writer
When Daniel and Vivian Rafuls came to Miami from Cuba three years ago,
they were warmly welcomed by exiles as examples of Fidel Castro supporters
who had grown disillusioned with communism.
Daniel, 40, a professor at Cuba's top military college, was soon interviewed
on Radio Marti and joined the Cuban Military Research Center, a group of
armed forces defectors who study the island's military.
Vivian, 42, who taught atheism at the University of Havana, lectured at a
University of Miami seminar on Cuba last year and found work through friends
as a substitute teacher at Kinloch Park Elementary.
But the Rafuls got an even warmer welcome when they returned to Cuba.
A ``companero from State Security called a meeting of Vivian's former
university co-workers in January and presented her as a ``true revolutionary
who had been ``on a mission abroad with her husband, said two Cubans
present.
The Rafuls were spies, just two of the 16 men and women identified as
Havana intelligence agents in Miami over the past six months by Cuba's State
Security Department or the FBI.

Some appear to have been career intelligence officers. Others were informers
or true Castro opponents at one time, threatened by Cuban security agents
with jail and worse for them and their families to force them to become
collaborators.

Their primary task was to penetrate exile groups and alert Havana to violent
plots.
But they also instigated conspiracies and sowed dissent among
exiles, a dozen U.S. officials and exiles told The Herald.
One spy's betrayal may have helped push an elderly exile to suicide.
Castro has long spied on South Florida's exile community, and over the years
knowledgeable exiles have estimated that he maintains some 300 trained
agents, collaborators and knowing or unknowing informers here at any one
time.

``It's been going on almost virtually since the day Fidel Castro came into
power,'' said Skip Brandon, a retired FBI agent who spent 10 years of his
career chasing suspected Cuban spies in the Miami area.
``South Florida is kind of interesting because the deep cover agents don't need
the kind of intensive language and other training that a Russian might have
needed,'' Brandon said. ``Someone from Cuba could come right in and go
right to work -- blow right through the doors.''
The FBI office in Miami has one Foreign Counter-Intelligence squad with
12-14 agents assigned exclusively to tracking suspected Cuban agents, and
another that follows all others, mostly Russians and Israelis.
Cuba, China, Iran, Israel, France and Russia were listed as the nations most
active in industrial espionage against the United States in a CIA report to
Congress in 1996.
But Havana's unveiling of six agents since January and the arrests of 10 other
suspects in Miami Sept. 12 have focused fresh attention on the spies, their
tales of exile terror plots and exile charges of Cuban provocations.
``When Castro accuses exiles of terrorism, their defense could be stupidity or
entrapment, said one State Department official, referring to recent Havana
charges that exile leaders financed a bombing campaign against Cuba from
1992 to 1998.

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Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 4:55 pm

Miami Herald
March 11, 1996
Spy bashes exiles, talks of uncertain future in Cuba
By CHRISTOPHER MARQUIS
HAVANA - If Juan Pablo Roque was a paid Cuban agent, he was apparently hired on the cheap, or told to exist on his wits and muscle. He arrived in Miami with a notion that "you stomp the ground and dollars spring up," but landed a string of menial jobs.
In an interview with The Herald last week, he voiced bitterness at being refused a home delivery manager's job at The Herald, and claimed he received no money from his memoirs, published by the Cuban American National Foundation.
He voiced distaste for Cuban cultural and economic influence in Miami, decrying an exile disdain for punctuality and efficiency. He even compared the relative merits of supermarkets, claiming that a well-known Hispanic-owned chain was too disorganized and sloppy.
"Every time I had anything to do with Hispanics, it was a disaster," he said. "I come from a very solid military discipline."
Roque said he has "nothing against American society" and holds U.S. achievements in science and technology in esteem. "I always felt gratified when I saw the big American companies at work," he said.
He had fond memories of a trip to Walt Disney World.
But his life in the "belly of the beast" - as he has called exile Miami - was hardscrabble and filled with intrigue, he said.
Roque's most explosive assertion: that the FBI knew Cuban authorities would down the Brothers' planes and had warned him not to fly.
Rogue also asserted that his sudden appearance in Havana at the time of the shootdown was `coincidental.'
Three days before the incident, Roque charged, he phoned Oscar Montoto, his contact in Miami's FBI office, to collect a payment of $1,500.
"Montoto told me not to fly," Roque said. "He said that things were abnormal, and that it wouldn't have a happy end. He warned me that [exile incursions) were going to be answered by Cuba."
Roque also asserted that his sudden appearance in Havana at the time of the incident was "coincidental."
He claims he returned to the island on Feb. 24, the day the Brothers' planes were shot down. "Like-minded Cubans" helped arrange his flight from Miami, Roque said, declining to elaborate.
However, Western diplomats here said Roque arrived one day before the incident, aboard a Cubana Airlines plane.
Roque, who claims all he ever wanted to do was fly planes, asserts he is now facing an uncertain future in Cuba.
He is waiting, he says, for Cuban authorities to grant him permanent resident status so he can find a job.
"They haven't told me how I'm going to work yet," he said. But he added: "They have told me there's no chance I can return to my life as an aviator."

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Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 5:01 pm

The Miami Herald
January 19, 1999


Spy ring for Cuba uncovered
By MARTIN AROSTEGUI
Special to The Herald
MADRID -- In the most serious espionage case yet uncovered in Spain,
prosecutors have charged five members of Spanish military intelligence and a
businessman of spying for the Cuban government.

The ring's activity involved secret meetings in Miami between the Spanish spies
and their Cuban handlers, plus money laundering, industrial espionage and
disseminating disinformation favorable to Cuba, court documents show.

Spanish intelligence chiefs became aware that something was wrong when efforts
to track more than 100 suspected Cuban spies were stymied because
microphones hidden in several offices and apartments around Madrid suddenly
stopped working.

Certain suspects were also successfully evading surveillance squads and no longer
discussing sensitive subjects in the usual places, a hint that Cuba was somehow
learning a lot about Spain's spy-catchers.
``We were confronted with the first penetration of our . . . intelligence service since
the East Germans tried it during the Cold War,'' said a Spanish intelligence officer
who asked not to be identified.
The accused officials of Spain's military intelligence agency, the Center of Defense
Information and Studies (CDIS), will not be publicly identified until they appear
before a special security court later this week, but the identity of the businessman
is known.
He is Jose Fernandez, an executive of several hotel and travel companies. He was
denounced by a business partner, Fernando Molina, who lost money investing in
Cuba, according to published reports.
Scandal surfaced
The scandal was broken last month by the Madrid newspaper La Razon and has
heightened sensitivities surrounding King Juan Carlos' first visit to Havana,
tentatively scheduled for March.
According to court records and intelligence sources, Cuba's main overseas spy
agency, the Ministry of the Interior's Directorate of Intelligence (DI) managed to
infiltrate the CDIS through an officer identified so far only by his first name, Luis.

Spokesmen for CDIS confirm that he held military rank and a position in the
agency's spy-catching counterintelligence section, code-named IB-4, when he was
recruited by the Cubans several years ago.

Another CDIS employee described as a civilian technical specialist was also
spying for Cuba,
according to official sources who maintain that he has signed a
confession and has been suspended from the service.
Three other CDIS officials are being charged with helping Fernandez carry out his
intelligence work for the Cubans, according to court records.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 5:04 pm

Base was moved
Cuba's Intelligence Directorate moved its main European base to Madrid in the
early 1990s,
after its previous base in Prague came under increased monitoring by
pro-American Czech intelligence, U.S. officials said.

CDIS officials believe Luis was approached by female Cuban agents in Madrid in
1991, before he was sent to Havana briefly as part of a special contingent when
the Spanish Embassy became jammed with dissidents seeking political asylum.
It was then that CDIS believes their officer was ``doubled.'' His reports were filled
with recommendations for giving in to Cuban government demands for the return
of the dissidents, and warnings of an imminent raid on the embassy by elite Cuban
troops that never took place.
Spanish officials said Luis has since spied on Spain's military integration with
NATO, the private lives of leading officials, and special operations units and
electronic warfare capabilities, including a type of aircraft acquired from the United
States that could be used against Cuba.

According to CDIS sources, Luis came under suspicion after a series of visits to
Miami, where he regularly contacted some companies believed to be used as
fronts by Cuban intelligence.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Mar Feb 12, 2008 5:09 pm

The Miami connection
``Miami was an important exchange and debriefing station for DI operations in
Spain as it was considered an area where someone from Spain could travel
regularly without generating suspicion,'' according to a source in the Spanish
Defense Ministry. Some companies used by Cuban intelligence are believed to
have been set up with the assistance of Spanish businessmen working for the
Cubans, according to the CDIS, but none have been publicly identified.

The accused spy, Jose Fernandez, helped to set up some DI fronts operating as
travel agencies and other commercial enterprises in Florida, Madrid, London,
Canada, Japan, Italy and Germany, according to recent Spanish media reports.
Court documents in the case identified one of the companies as Grupo Oasis, a
tourism firm registered in Panama that lists its business address in Cancun, Mexico,
and runs several beach resorts in Cuba.

Oasis has been linked to Spain's biggest corruption scandal, involving banker
Mario Conde, currently jailed on embezzlement and fraud charges.
Sources said
Fernandez helped Conde funnel some $2 million to Cuba.
Cuban Tourism Minister Osmani Cienfuegos made a discreet weeklong visit last
summer to the Spanish resort of Marbella, where he was the guest of the mayor,
Jesus Gil, a real estate developer recently convicted on charges of embezzlement.
Marbella city officials allege that Gil's deputies regularly carry large quantities of
cash to Cuba in briefcases.

The spy scandal is the worst intelligence conflict between Madrid and Havana
since Cuban agents tried to abduct a defecting Cuban diplomat from the streets of
Madrid in 1986. That incident drew a diplomatic protest from the Socialist
government of Felipe Gonzales.
CDIS officials insist that the Cuban spy ring caused no substantial or long-term
damage to Spain and expressed confidence that the moles were caught ``at a
relatively green state'' before gaining promotion to higher positions.
Cuban intelligence defectors also report that the cash-strapped Cuban economy is
inhibiting its intelligence services.
``The Castro brothers now demand strict accounting of all money spent. This is
demoralizing field operatives,'' one said.


Copyright © 1999 The Miami Herald

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por jose gonzalez el Mar Feb 12, 2008 10:53 pm

cuba4free,all this is really good stuff...is better to write a book about it....

i can't get enough of this....

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Jue Feb 14, 2008 3:30 pm

Joe, bro... it continues. Now, look at this.



Ana Belen Montes

Ana Belen Montes: The chronicle of an American Spy for the Cuban Government
by Manuel Cereijo
On 21 September 2001, the FBI arrested Ana Belen Montes, a US citizen born 28 February 1957, on a US military installation in Nurnberg, Germany. She was charged with spying for Cuban intelligence for the past five years.
ANA BELEN MONTES
Montes graduated with a major in Foreign Affairs from the University of Virginia in 1979 and obtained a Masters Degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in 1988. She is single and lived alone at 3039 Macomb Street, NW, apartment 20, Washington, DC. Until her arrest, Montes was employed by the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) as a senior intelligence analyst. She began her employment with DIA in September 1985 and since 1992 has specialized in Cuba matters. She worked at Bolling Air Force Base in Washington, DC. Prior to joining DIA, Montes worked at the Department of Justice. In 1993, she traveled to Cuba to study the Cuban military on a CIA-paid study for the Center for the Study of Intelligence.
Communication from the Cuban Intelligence Service (CuIS) to Montes via Shortwave Radio
During a court-authorized surreptitious entry into Montes’s residence, conducted by the FBI on 25 May 2001, FBI agents observed a Toshiba laptop computer.1 During the search, the agents electronically copied the laptop’s hard drive. During subsequent analysis of the copied hard drive, the FBI recovered substantial text that had been deleted.
The recovered text from the laptop’s hard drive included significant portions of a Spanish- language message, which when printed out with standard font comes to approximately 11 pages of text. The recovered portion of the message does not expressly indicate when it was composed. However, it instructs the message recipient to travel to "the Friendship Heights station" on "Saturday, November 23rd."
Although no date was on the message, November 23 fell on a Saturday in 1996. The FBI determined that this message was composed sometime before 23 November 1996 and entered onto Montes’s laptop sometime after 5 October 1996, the date she purchased it. On the basis of its content, the message is from a CuIS officer to Montes.2 Portions of the recovered message included the following: "You should go to the WIPE program and destroy that file according to the steps which we discussed during the contact. This is a basic step to take every time you receive a radio message or some disk."
During this same search, the agents also observed a Sony shortwave radio stored in a previously opened box on the floor of the bedroom. The agents turned on the radio to confirm that it was operable. Also found was an earpiece3 that could be utilized with this shortwave radio, allowing the radio to be listened to more privately.
The recovered portion of the message begins with the following passage:
Nevertheless, I learned that you entered the code communicating that you were having problems with radio reception. The code alone covers a lot, meaning that we do not know specifically what types of difficulty you are having. Given that it’s only been a few days since we began the use of new systems, let’s not rule out that the problem might be related to them. In that case, I’m going to repeat the necessary steps to take in order to retrieve a message.
The message then describes how the person reading the message should "write the information you send to us and the numbers of the radio messages which you receive." The message later refers to going "to a new line when you get to the group 10 of the numbers that you receive via radio," and still later gives as an "example" a series of groups of numbers: "22333 44444 77645 77647 90909 13425 76490 78399 7865498534." After some further instruction, the message states: "Here the program deciphers the message and it retrieves the text onto the screen, asking you if the text is okay or not." Near the conclusion of the message, there is the statement, "In this shipment you will receive the following disks: . . . 2) Disks ‘R1’ to decipher our mailings and radio."
Further FBI analysis of Montes’s copied Toshiba hard drive identified text consisting of a series of 150 five-number groups. The text begins, "30107 24624" and continues until 150 such groups are listed. The FBI determined that the precise same numbers"in the precise same order"were broadcast on 6 February 1999 at AM frequency 7887 kHz, by a woman speaking Spanish, who introduced the broadcast with the words "Attencion! Attencion!" The frequency used in that February 1999 broadcast is within the frequency range of the shortwave radio observed in Montes’s residence on 25 May 2001.
Communication between the CuIS and Montes via Computer Diskette4
Montes communicated with her CuIS handling officer by passing and receiving computer diskettes containing encrypted messages. The message described above that was contained on the hard drive of Montes’s laptop computer contained the following passage:
Continue writing along the same lines you have so far, but cipher the information every time you do, so that you do not leave prepared information that is not ciphered in the house. This is the most sensitive and compromising information that you hold. We realize that this entails the difficulty of not being able to revise or consult what was written previously before each shipment, but we think it is worth taking this provisional measure. It is not a problem for us if some intelligence element comes repeated or with another defect which obviously cannot help, we understand this perfectly"Give "E" only the ciphered disks. Do not give, for the time being, printed or photographed material. Keep the materials which you can justify keeping until we agree that you can deliver them."Keep up the measure of formatting the disks we send you with couriers or letters as soon as possible, leaving conventional notes as reminders only of those things to reply to or report.
The message goes on to refer to a "shipment" that contains "Disk ‘S1’" to cipher the information you send," and, as indicated in the previous section, to "Disk ‘R1’ to decipher our mailings and radio." Earlier in the message, there is a reference to "information you receive either via radio or disk."
During the court-authorized search of the residence on 25 May 2001, two boxes containing a total of 16 diskettes were observed. During a subsequent search on 8 August 2001, a box containing 41 diskettes, later determined to be blank, were observed. Finally, records obtained from a Radio Shack store located near Montes’s residence indicated that Montes purchased 160 floppy diskettes during the period 1 May 1993 to 2 November 1997.
Communication from Montes to the CuIS by Pager5
On the basis of the evidence, Montes communicated with her handling CuIS officer using a pager. In the same message copied from Montes’s hard drive, there is a passage that states:
Beepers that you have. The only beepers in use at present are the following: 1) (917) [first seven-digit telephone number omitted from this application], use it with identification code 635. 2) (917) [second seven-digit telephone number omitted from this application]. Use it with identification code 937. 3) (917) [third seven-digit telephone number omitted from this application] Use it only with identification code 2900 . . . because this beeper is public, in other words it is known to belong to the Cuban Mission at the UN and we assume there is some control over it. You may use this beeper only in the event you cannot communicate with those mentioned in 1) and 2), which are secure.
The reference to "control over it" in the above passage refers to the CuIS officer’s suspicion that the FBI is aware that this beeper number is associated with the Cuban Government and is monitoring it in some fashion.
In addition, the message on the laptop’s hard drive includes a portion stating that the message recipient "entered the code communicating that you were having problems with radio reception." This portion of the message indicates that Montes at some point shortly prior to receiving the message sent a page to her CuIS officer handler consisting of a preassigned series of numbers to indicate she was having communication problems.
Montes’s Transmission of Classified Information to the CuIS
The same message described above, as well as other messages recovered from the laptop’s hard drive, contained the following information indicating that Montes had been tasked to provide and did provide classified information to the CuIS. In one portion of the message discussed above, the CuIS officer states:
What ***6 said during the meeting . . . was very interesting. Surely you remember well his plans and expectations when he was coming here. If I remember right, on that occasion, we told you how tremendously useful the information you gave us from the meetings with him resulted, and how we were waiting here for him with open arms.
The very next section in the message states:
We think the opportunity you will have to participate in the ACOM exercise in December is very good. Practically, everything that takes place there will be of intelligence value. Let’s see if it deals with contingency plans and specific targets in Cuba, which are to prioritized interests for us.
The "ACOM exercise in December" is a reference to a war games exercise in December 1996 conducted by the US Atlantic Command"a US Department of Defense unified command, in Norfolk, Virginia. Details about the exercise’s "contingency plans and specific targets" is classified Secret and relates to the national defense of the United States. DIA advised that Montes attended the above exercise in Norfolk as part of her official DIA duties.
A separate message partially recovered from the hard drive of Montes’s Toshiba laptop revealed details about a particular Special Access Program (SAP) related to the national defense of the United States:
In addition, just today the agency made me enter into a program, "special access top secret. [First name and last name omitted from this application] and I are the only ones in my office who know about the program." [The details related about this SAP in this message are classified "Top Secret" / SCI.]
DIA has confirmed that Montes and a colleague with the same name as that related in the portion of the message described above were briefed into this SAP on 15 May 1997.
In yet another message recovered from the laptop, there is a statement revealing that "we have noticed" the location, number, and type of certain Cuban military weapons in Cuba. This information is precisely the type of information that was within Montes’s area of expertise and was, in fact, an accurate statement of the US Intelligence Community’s knowledge on this particular issue. The information is classified Secret.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Jue Feb 14, 2008 3:40 pm


Ana Belen Montes. 1987

FBI Physical Surveillance of Montes and Telephone Records for May to September
The FBI maintained periodic physical surveillance of Montes during the period May to September 2001. On 20 May 2001, Montes left her residence and drove to the Hecht’s on Wisconsin Avenue, in Chevy Chase, Maryland. She entered the store at 1:07 p.m. and exited by the rear entrance at 1:27 p.m. She then sat down on a stonewall outside the rear entrance and waited for approximately two minutes. At 1:30 p.m., the FBI observed her walk to a pay phone approximately 20 feet from where she was sitting. She placed a one-minute call to a pager number using a prepaid calling card. At 1:45 p.m., she drove out of the Hecht’s lot and headed north on Wisconsin Avenue toward Bethesda, Maryland. At 1:52 p.m., she parked her car in a lot and went into Modell’s Sporting Goods store. She quickly exited the store carrying a bag and crossed Wisconsin Avenue to an Exxon station. She was observed looking over her right and left shoulders as she crossed the Exxon lot. At 2:00 p.m., she placed a one-minute call from a pay phone at the Exxon station to the same pager number using the same prepaid calling card. By 2:08 p.m., Montes had walked back to her vehicle and was driving back to her residence where she arrived at 2:30 p.m.
On 3 June 2001, Montes engaged in similar communications activity. She left her residence at approximately 2:30 p.m. and drove to a bank parking lot at the corner of Harrison Street, NW and Wisconsin Avenue, NW. She exited her car at approximately 2:37 p.m. and entered a Borders books store on Wisconsin Avenue. She left the store approximately 40 minutes later. She then crossed Wisconsin Avenue to the vicinity of three public pay phones near the southern exit of the Friendship Heights Metro Station. At 3:28 p.m., she placed a one-minute call using the same prepaid calling card to the same pager number she had called on 20 May 2001. After a few minutes, she walked back to her car and drove to a grocery store.
Pursuant to court authorization, on 16 August 2001, the FBI searched Montes’s pocketbook. In a separate compartment of Montes’s wallet, the FBI found the prepaid calling card used to place the calls on 20 May 2001 and 3 June 2001. In the same small compartment, the FBI located a slip of paper on which was written the pager number she had called. Written above this pager number was a set of digits, which comprised one or more codes for Montes to use after calling the pager number; for example, after contacting the pager, she keys in a code to be sent to the pager which communicates a particular pre-established message.
On 26 August 2001, at approximately 10:00 a.m., the FBI observed Montes making a brief pay telephone call to the same pager number from a gas station/convenience store located at the intersection of Connecticut and Nebraska Avenues, NW in Washington, DC.
On September 14, 2001, Montes left work and drove directly to her residence. She then walked to Connecticut Avenue, NW, in Washington, D.C., still wearing her business clothes, and made a stop at a dry cleaning shop. She then entered the National Zoo through the Connecticut Avenue entrance. She proceeded to the "Prairie Land" overlook where she stayed for only 30 seconds. She then walked further into the zoo compound and basically retraced her route out of the zoo. At approximately 6:30 p.m., Montes removed a small piece of paper or card from her wallet and walked to a public phone booth located just outside the pedestrian entrance to the zoo. Montes then made what telephone records confirmed to be two calls to the same pager number she had called in May, June, and August, as described above. The records reflect that the first call was unsuccessful"the call lasted zero seconds. According to the records, she made a second call one minute later that lasted 33 seconds. Shortly after making these calls, Montes looked at her watch and then proceeded to walk back to her residence.
On 15 September 2001, telephone records pertaining to the prepaid calling card number on the card observed in her pocketbook on 16 August 2001 showed that Montes made a call to the same pager number at 11:12 a.m. that lasted one minute.
The next day "16 September" Montes left her residence in the early afternoon and took the Metro (Red Line) to the Van Ness-UDC station in Washington, DC. She made a brief telephone call from a payphone in the Metro station at approximately 1:50 p.m., again to the same pager number.
Montes owned a cell phone, which was observed during a court-authorized search of her tote bag on 16 August 2001. In addition, during surveillance on 16 September 2001, Montes was observed speaking on a cell phone. Furthermore, telephone records obtained in May 2001 confirm that she has subscribed to cell telephone service continually from 26 October 1996 to 14 May 2001. Montes’s use of public pay phones notwithstanding her access to a cell phone supports the conclusion that the pay phone calls were in furtherance of Montes’s espionage.
On 19 March 2002, Montes pleaded guilty to espionage in U.S. District Court in Washington, DC, and admitted that, for 16 years, she had passed top secret information to Cuban intelligence. She used shortwave radios, encrypted transmissions, and a pay telephone to contact Cuban intelligence officials and provide them the names of four US intelligence officers working in Cuba. She also informed Cuban intelligence about a US "special access program" and revealed that the US Government had uncovered the location of various Cuban military installations.
Both her defense attorney and federal prosecutors said that Montes was motivated by her moral outrage at US policy toward Cuba"an impoverished island country"and not by money. She received only "nominal" expenses for her activities.
Although Montes could receive the death penalty for her crime, the plea agreement calls for a 25-year prison term if she cooperates with the FBI and other investigators by providing all the details she knows about Cuban intelligence activities. Judge Ricardo M. Urbina set a sentencing date of September 2002.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Jue Feb 14, 2008 3:46 pm

End notes

1. A receipt obtained from a CompUSA store located in Alexandria, Virginia, indicated that, on 5 October 1996, one "Ana B. Montes" purchased a refurbished Toshiba laptop computer, model 405CS, serial number 10568512. The Toshiba laptop in her apartment had the same serial number on it as the one she purchased.
2. The CuIS often communicates with clandestine CuIS agents operating outside Cuba by broadcasting encrypted messages at certain high frequencies. Under this method, the CuIS broadcasts a series of numbers on a particular frequency. The clandestine agent, monitoring the message on a shortwave radio, keys in the numbers onto a computer and then uses a diskette containing a decryption program to convert the seemingly random series of numbers into Spanish- language text. This was the methodology employed by some of the defendants convicted last June in the Southern District of Florida of espionage on behalf of Cuba and acting as unregistered agents of Cuba, in the case of United States of America v. Gerardo Hernandez, et al. (See Cuban Spies in Miami). Although it is very difficult to decrypt a message without access to the relevant decryption program, once decrypted on the agent’s computer the decrypted message resides on the computer’s hard drive unless the agent takes careful steps to cleanse the hard drive of the message. Simply "deleting" the file is not sufficient.
3. Similar earpieces were found in the residences of the defendants in the Hernandez case.
4. On the basis of knowledge of the methodology employed by the CuIS, a clandestine CuIS agent often communicates with his or her handling CuIS officer by typing a message onto a computer and then encrypting and saving it to a diskette. The agent, thereafter, physically delivers the diskette, either directly or indirectly, to the officer. In addition, as an alternative to sending an encrypted shortwave radio broadcast, a CuIS officer often will similarly place an encrypted message onto a diskette and again simply physically deliver the diskette, clandestinely, to the agent. Upon receipt of the encrypted message, either by the CuIS officer or the agent, the recipient employs a decryption program contained on a separate diskette to decrypt the message. The exchange of diskettes containing encrypted messages, and the use of decryption programs contained on separate diskettes, was one of the clandestine communication techniques utilized by the defendants in the Hernandez case. Although it is difficult to decrypt a message without the decryption program, the very process of encrypting or decrypting a message on a computer causes a decrypted copy of the message to be placed on the computer’s hard drive. Unless affirmative steps are taken to cleanse the hard drive"beyond simply "deleting" the message"the message can be retrieved from the hard drive.
5. On the basis of knowledge of the methodology employed by the CuIS, a clandestine CuIS agent often communicates with his or her handling CuIS officer by making calls to a pager number from a pay telephone booth and entering a preassigned code to convey a particular message. The defendants in the Hernandez case also utilized this methodology.
6. The FBI replaced in this application with "***" a word that begins with a capital letter, which was not translated, and is, in fact, the true last name of a US intelligence officer who was present in an undercover capacity, in Cuba, during a period that began prior to October 1996. The above quoted portion of the message indicates that Montes disclosed the US officer’s intelligence agency affiliation and anticipated presence in Cuba to the CuIS, which information is classified "Secret." As a result, the Cuban Government was able to direct its counterintelligence resources against the US officer ("we were waiting here for him with open arms").

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por jose gonzalez el Jue Feb 14, 2008 11:33 pm

i hope that bitch "se pudra en el infierno".....

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Sáb Mar 15, 2008 4:01 pm

Cuban Espionage Activities Against the U.S.
Thursday, 31 July 2003, 12:40 pm
Press Release: US State Department
Cuban Espionage Activities Against the United States
State Dept. highlights several recent incidents
The U.S. Department of State issued a fact sheet on July 30, eexamining Cuba's history of espionage against the United States and
outlining several examples of recent anti-U.S. spying by Cuban agents. These incidents are simply the latest evidence that the regime of Cuban
dictator Fidel Castro "has long targeted the United States for intensive espionage activities," the State Department said.
Following is the text of the fact sheet, with further details:
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Washington, D.C.
FACT SHEET
Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs
July 30, 2003
Cuba: Espionage
The Castro regime has long targeted the United States for intensive espionage activities. Castro himself told CNN in an interview in 1998:
"Yes, we have sometimes dispatched Cuban citizens to the United States to infiltrate counter-revolutionary organizations, to inform us
about activities that are of great interest to us. I think we have a right to do this."
-- Ana Montes, a Defense Intelligence Agency analyst, confessed to spying for Cuba for 16 years (from 1985 to the time of her arrest on
September 21, 2001). Among other highly damaging actions, she gave the Cuban Government the names of four U.S. covert intelligence
officers working in Cuba and gathered writings, documents, and materials for unlawful delivery to the Government of Cuba.
-- Seven Cuban spies, the so-called Wasp Network, were convicted of or confessed to espionage or related crimes in June and September
2001. The group sought to infiltrate U.S. Southern Command headquarters. One was convicted for delivering a message to the
Cuban Government that contributed to the death of four fliers from Brothers to the Rescue who were shot down in 1996 by Cuban MiGs
in international airspace.

-- An INS official, provided information in 2000 in a sting operation, thereafter passed the information to a business associate with ties to
Cuban intelligence. As a corollary to this case, two Cuban diplomats were expelled from the United States for espionage activities.
-- Over a 15-year period from 1983 to 1998, 15 members of the Cuban mission to the United Nations were expelled for espionage
activities, including three who were handlers for the Wasp Network in 1998.

-- Cuban spies have also found considerable success penetrating U.S.-based exile groups. A notable example is that of Juan Pablo
Roque, a former MiG-23 pilot who defected to the United States in 1992, became a paid source for the FBI, and joined the ranks of the
Brothers to the Rescue (BTTR). He re-defected back to Cuba just days after the early 1996 BTTR shoot down, denouncing the exile
group on Cuban television and accusing it of planning terrorist attacks against Cuba and Castro.
-- A similar example involves the case of Jose Rafael Fernandez Brenes, who jumped ship from a Cuban merchant vessel in 1988.
From 1988-1991, he helped establish and run the U.S. Government-financed TV Marti, whose signal was jammed from its
inception in March 1990, due in part to frequency and technical data provided by Fernandez Brenes.

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Mensaje por cuba4free el Sáb Mar 15, 2008 4:06 pm


October 8, 2000







A Document by Cuban Spy Talks of Acts Against C.I.A.


By JULIA PRESTON and TIM WEINER


EXICO CITY, Oct. 7 — When he was arrested by the Mexican government this week, a Cuban spy on the run from his government was carrying a document, parts of which were made public today, in which he outlined his career running operations against the Central Intelligence Agency.
The Cuban official, Pedro Riera Escalante, who was summarily deported by Mexico to Havana on Wednesday, served under cover as the Cuban consul here from 1986 through 1991. In the document, he described Cuban espionage operations against the C.I.A. station in Mexico City and other operations he ran in Europe and Africa.
His deportation ended his month-long effort to win political asylum in Mexico.
Mr. Riera, who had become deeply disillusioned with his president, Fidel Castro, also spoke about his intelligence work in general terms in conversations with The New York Times, with Mexican foreign relations and national security officials with whom he discussed asylum and with human rights advocates who helped him petition for refuge.
In the document, excerpts of which were published by the Mexico City newspaper Reforma on Friday, Mr. Riera said that he had recruited scores of Mexican informants, including officials, businessmen, intelligence officers and journalists.
Among the successes he claimed was a 1989 operation, code-named "Lupa," or "Magnifying Glass," in which he said he obtained the correspondence of recruited C.I.A. agents in Mexico. Another operation was code-named "Moncada," in which he said he used a renegade C.I.A. officer, Philip Agee, to try to recruit the secretary of the deputy chief of the C.I.A. station in Mexico City. United States intelligence officials have described the operation as a total failure, saying Mr. Agee, who broke publicly with the C.I.A. in the 1970's and is regarded by the agency as a traitor, was quickly identified, and his approach rebuffed. Mr. Agee did not return an e-mail sent to his office in Cuba on Tuesday.
Mr. Riera said he had worked with Mr. Agee for years. He said the work began in 1973, when he was a liaison between Mr. Agee and the Cuban Politburo, when Mr. Agee was writing a book exposing C.I.A. secrets. Mr. Riera said that he conveyed suggestions from the government about what information Mr. Agee should disclose in his book. He said telephone numbers for C.I.A. officials in the United States Embassy in Mexico City provided by Mr. Agee proved useful to Cuba years later, when Mr. Riera was posted here, helping him identify which embassy personnel were C.I.A. officers.
United States officials have not commented on Mr. Riera's case, other than a statement from the American Embassy in Mexico City expressing concern about his fate in Cuba.
After a number of overseas assignments, including one in 1977 in which he said he persuaded President Samora Machel to throw C.I.A. personnel out of Mozambique, Mr. Riera said he was assigned by his bosses in Cuba's General Directorate of Intelligence to draw up a manual to instruct Cuban spies about how best to infiltrate the C.I.A.
The manual, "Methodology for Recruitment of C.I.A. Staff Personnel," became a standard training tool for Cuban agents, he said. It demanded personal and psychological profiles of potential recruits to pinpoint weaknesses and vulnerabilities. And it advised using money, not ideology, to lure C.I.A. personnel into collaborating.
Mr. Riera was proud of what he regarded as highly effective work by Cuban intelligence against the C.I.A. during his service. He accused Mr. Castro of destroying the Cuban agency by turning it to his political ends.
Mr. Riera, who is 49, joined the Cuban directorate as a teenager in 1969, the documents show. He was recalled to Cuba in 1992 and stepped down from active duty a year later, with the rank of major. He remains on reserve.
In conversations with The Times, Mr. Riera said that he did not want to seek exile in the United States, but hoped for safe haven in Mexico. Reuters reported today from Havana that Mr. Riera was back in Cuba but his whereabouts were not known.
Mexican officials gave conflicting accounts about Mr. Riera's deportation. The Foreign Ministry confirmed that two senior officials there met with Mr. Riera in recent weeks to hear his safe haven request. Foreign Minister Rosario Green said through her spokesman that she turned the matter over to the Interior Ministry, which handles both national security and immigration.
But José Ángel Pescador Osuna, the Interior Ministry's top official for immigration, said today that he had heard nothing about Mr. Riera from the Foreign Ministry and had no record of an asylum request. He said Mr. Riera was deported because he did not produce a valid Mexican visa.

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Mensaje por cuba4free el Sáb Mar 15, 2008 4:10 pm

As Spat Grows, Cuba Accuses U.S. of Meddling


writePost();


Published: November 9, 2002

Cuba responded today to the expulsion of four of its diplomats from the United States by accusing the American Mission in Havana of breaking international norms by spying and meddling in its internal affairs.
''The government of the United States knows that we can present ample evidence of their activities of espionage and constant subversion against Cuba,'' said a statement from the Foreign Ministry that was published in the Communist Party daily Granma.
American diplomats have angered President Fidel Castro's government by helping dissidents and by handing out short-wave radios for Cubans to listen to American broadcasts.
The Cuban statement said the American interference violated the Vienna Convention on diplomatic relations.
Cuba said the expulsions, ordered last week, were a ''grotesque'' ploy to win votes in Tuesday's election among Cuban exiles in Florida, where President Bush's brother Jeb was re-elected governor.
The expulsions were also aimed at undermining growing support in the United States for lifting the four-decade-old trade sanctions against Cuba, the Cuban statement said.
On Nov. 1, the State Department declared first secretaries Gustavo Machín Gómez and Óscar Redondo at the Cuban interests section in Washington ''persona non grata'' and gave them 10 days to leave the country.
Two Cuban diplomats at the United Nations in New York, Francisco González and Carlos Suanes, were also asked to leave the United States ''for engaging in activities deemed to be harmful to the United States outside their official capacity.''
The expulsions were a response to the activities of Ana Belén Montes, a former American intelligence officer who was sentenced in October to 25 years in prison for spying for Cuba.
Ms. Montes analyzed intelligence about Cuba for the Defense Intelligence Agency. She admitted she had voluntarily spied for the Cuban government for 17 years for ideological reasons.
The United States broke off diplomatic relations with Cuba over 40 years ago after Mr. Castro seized power in a 1959 revolution. However, the two nations maintain interests sections in each other's capitals.

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

Mensaje por cuba4free el Sáb Mar 15, 2008 4:12 pm

The Associated Press
November 8, 2002
Cuba Denies Charges About Diplomats
By ANITA SNOW
Associated Press Writer
HAVANA (AP) — Cuba rejected U.S. charges that four Cuban diplomats who were ordered to leave the United States engaged in
unacceptable activities, and said American diplomats in Havana were involved in "subversive'' work.
The Foreign Ministry statement set the stage for the possible retaliatory expulsion of American diplomats from Havana. ``Cuba has
the right to respond, and will, at the appropriate moment,'' it said.
The United States government ``doesn't have the least bit of moral authority, nor any justification to propose these assertions
against our diplomats,'' the statement said.
It warned that ``we can present broad evidence of the activities of constant espionage and subversion against Cuba.''
On Tuesday, the U.S. State Department ordered the expulsion of two Washington-based Cuban diplomats for their role in support of
a spy for Cuba who recently was sentenced to a 25-year prison term.
Oscar Redondo Toledo and Gustavo Machin Gomez were given 10 days to leave the country.
The order came shortly before two members of Cuba's mission to the United Nations were asked to leave the United States for
``engaging in activities deemed to be harmful to the United States'' — believed to be spying.
They were later identified as Francisco Gonzalez Garcia, a counselor, and Carlos Augusto Suanes Flexas, a second secretary.
Havana blamed the action against its diplomats on Cuban-born U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Otto Reich. It said Reich was
obsessed with trying to halt ``the unstoppable advance of forces in the United States against the policy of aggressions and attacks
against Cuba.''

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Re: Cuban intelligence activities in The U.S. and other countries. Art.

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